BLOG TOUR! How to Write a Love Story by Katy Cannon

how to write a love story I’m a hopeless romantic so clearly when I heard about this book I wanted to read it!  How to Write a Love Story by young adult author Katy Cannon, tells the story of Tilly Frost, who has grown up reading her grandmother’s bestselling romance novels. When her grandmother is taken ill, Tilly has to finish her latest work and so begins a brand new chapter in her life, that will bring new meaning to the words ‘love story’.  Written with warmth, humour and a great deal of insight into teenage heartaches, How to Write a Love Story is bound to delight its readers.

I’m delighted to be hosting this stop on the blog tour to celebrate the publication of How to Write a Love Story and to welcome Katy Cannon to the blog. Katy has written several successful YA novels including Love, Lies and Lemon Pies which has been published in eight languages.

Today Katy has written a very special guest post for me to share.  What would you say to your sixteen year old self?  The benefit of hindsight can be hugely revealing and I’m very honoured to share this personal letter written by Katy to her sixteen year old self.

A Love Letter To Young Katy 

“Dear Sixteen Year Old Me 

Right now, with GCSEs looming and friends getting into all sorts of trouble, I know it feels like this year will never end. But I’m here to tell you that it does, and that life gets better. Being a teenager sucks, I’m not going to pretend otherwise. But, twenty years on, I can look back at you and smile. You’re not perfect, but you’re me, and you’ve got a lot more going for you than you think.

You’re a great friend – supportive and sympathetic. And that’s something I hope I’ve held onto from those times, to always help a friend in need. They’ll help you back when you need it too, but that’s not why we do it. We do it because we care. 

You’re smarter than you think. Yes, GCSEs are hard. So are A-Levels and your degree, when you get there. But you do get there. You work hard and you achieve what you set out to do. (Even passing your driving test. So don’t stress out too much the first time you fail. Or even the fourth time, come to that. Just keep at it.) That ability to keep on trying, to keep going even when the odds seem stacked against you (like that U grade in your Science GCSE mock) will take you great places. You’ll travel the world, meet incredible people, even fall in love, for real this time.

And most of all – you’ll get to live your dream. It’ll take every last bit of courage and perseverance and determination you have in your bones and blood, but one day you’ll see your own book on the shelf in a bookshop, with your name written in bright letters on the cover. (And sometimes other names, and lots of other books, but that’s another story.)

But for now, just be kind. Not just to your friends, but to our family (even Dad when he’s grumpy) and to yourself. They’re all trying their best, and so are you. It’s hard figuring out your place in the world. But you don’t have to be perfect at it – or anything else – right now. There’s time to get it right, and honestly? You’ll never be perfect. But as long as you keep trying, you’ll get a little better every day.

And that’s all any of us can hope for.

With love, always

Your older self xxx”

 

 

Find out more at www.katycannon.com 

Don’t forget to check out the rest of the blog tour!

HTWALS Blog Tour 2

With thanks to Stripes Publishing for sending me this book to review.

BLOG TOUR! The Wardrobe Monster by Bryony Thomson.

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I’m so pleased to be participating in the blog tour today for The Wardrobe Monster, especially as it’s my current Book of the Month!

The Wardrobe Monster is a delightful story written and illustrated by Bryony Thomson, published by Old Barn Books.  The tale features a young girl Dora and her three toy friends who’ve been unable to sleep at night due to the strange and scary sound coming from the wardrobe.  No matter how much they try to ignore it they simply can’t and eventually Dora plucks up the courage, with the help of her friends, to find out just exactly who or what is making all the noise….

I absolutely loved this story. It’s childlike appeal creates a gentle narrative accompanied by beautifully drawn, unique illustrations. With utterly endearing characters, the enduring theme of being scared of the dark and imagining monsters in the wardrobe is one we can all relate too. The reassurance as we discover that what’s in the wardrobe isn’t scary at all is palpable and little ones will be delighted with the gorgeous green and pink Wardrobe Monster who topples out!  The best stories are ones we can identify with and I’m sure many will be pleased to know they are not alone in their night time fears and feel much relieved to see things are never as scary as we imagine. The Wardrobe Monster is a warm-hearted story, great to read aloud and sure to become a firm bedtime favourite.

I’m delighted to host a guest post today for the blog tour by Bryony, sharing more about the inspiration for The Wardrobe Monster.  Bryony studied fine art and completed an MA in Children’s Book Illustration at Cambridge School of Art. Her work has already achieved critical acclaim in the form of a High Commended award in the MacMillan Prize and being shortlisted for the Bridgeman Studio Award.  Definitely one to watch!

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“The basic idea for The Wardrobe Monster was floating around in my head for a long time before I managed to get it down on paper – I think perhaps it needed to stew like a good cup of tea! Most of my stories are based on my own life or things I have seen, overheard or experienced and so it takes a little while to figure out how to turn them into a more universal story that can hopefully be enjoyed by everyone.

The inspiration for The Wardrobe Monster came quite directly from my own experiences. I went away to boarding school when I was eight years old which was a little scary and daunting. The school was in a very old stately home in Norfolk and we slept in these huge Georgian dormitories which had enormous looming wardrobes and somewhat temperamental plumbing. The result was that once you were tucked up in bed and the lights went out there were a lot of dark shadows lurking in the corners and strange clanking and banging noises throughout the night. I can remember lying there under the duvet much like Dora with my rather overactive imagination running wild, picturing all the different, unpleasant and scary things that could be making these noises!WM Spd1.jpg

I remember feeling silly for being frightened and so through the story of The Wardrobe Monster I wanted to show that it is OK to be scared – everyone is at one point or another, even those who put on a good facade. But also that if you can summon up the courage to be brave you will often discover that the thing you were afraid of isn’t nearly as bad as you thought. I’m not sure this is a lesson I’ve learnt yet, but it’s something I remind myself of fairly frequently! Ultimately in The Wardrobe Monster I was aiming to create the kind of story that would have made my eight year old self feel better.

Just as the story was inspired by my experiences, the characters are also based on real people. For me this is a really helpful approach as it means that I already know how they will react to certain situations and the kind of mannerisms they will use. Bear is very much my Mum, always taking the rational approach and trying to calm everyone down; Penguin is a bit like my Dad, especially in his sense of foreboding and slight tendency to melodrama, and Lion is definitely my husband getting a little bit over-excited and keen to dive in head first. The only character not based on anyone is Wardrobe Monster himself but I think this is because his character was always ‘other’, he was the scary unknown and so couldn’t be based on anything I was familiar with. In the end though it turns out he’s just a big cuddly monster who’s no less scared than anyone else!”

Thank you Bryony for sharing this insight with us – it’s great to hear where your ideas came from and how this story is rooted in your desire to reassure young readers and encourage them to be brave!

With thanks to Old Barn Books and Liz Scott for inviting me to participate in this blog tour and sending me a copy of The Wardrobe Monster to review.

Find out more at www.bryonythomson.com and www.oldbarnbooks.com

Check out the next stop on the blog tour at https://jillrbennett.wordpress.com

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Guest blog: Margrete Lamond on The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear

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The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear by Margrete Lamond, illustrated by Heather Vallance is a quirky, bittersweet tale of friendship.  It stands out for its slightly darker tone and not necessarily happy ‘ending’ rather like one of Aesop’s fables – but perhaps give a more lifelike picture of how some friendships really can be.  In this story accompanied by stunning charcoal illustrations, Fox and Bear fall out, with Fox being a cunning trickster and Bear falling for his ploys – again and again. Bear realises he too can play the trickster and he sets about to teach Fox a lesson. Hare and Rooster join in with their opinions on Fox’s trickery giving Bear even more desire to get back at Fox.  But as you might imagine, Bear doesn’t feel quite so good afterwards and wonders if he made the right decision…..

Children are often far more intelligent and resilient than they’re given credit for and I can imagine many heartfelt and heated opinions if you read this aloud to your class. The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear takes off the rose-tinted glasses and shows how sometimes ‘friends’ can be mean, sometimes they can let us down and sometimes we can let our friends down. Perhaps the point about being friends is accepting friendship won’t always be perfect and that forgiveness is central to ensure its longevity.  Margrete Lamond

Today to share more insight into to the inspiration behind this story, I’m really pleased to welcome to the blog author Margrete Lamond, who I am sure will have you reaching for your copy to re read or ordering one from the bookshop immediately! Welcome to the blog Margrete!

“The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear is an aggregate of several Norwegian folk-tales. It is also a mash-up of scenarios, an introduction of unrelated characters and relationships, and a reinvention of the motivations of the main players Bear, Fox, Rooster and Hare. Each borrowed tale, and each character, has been twisted, moulded, pummelled and reshaped. Even so, the original sources remain clear.

I can’t resist retelling a folk tale. Retelling, for me, is the ultimate writerly indulgence. The bones of the story have been established and much of the brain-grinding groundwork has already been done. All I need do is sit down and play with language, sentences, patterns and rhythms and sounds, invest the story with an uneasy voice, suggest a disturbing undertow and – O ultimate joy – craft an ambiguous ending. Not to mention play around with the hopes, desires and motivations of the characters. All this, without once having to agonise over fundamental plotting. Tweaking, yes. Retelling, yes. Giving the original tales a thoroughgoing structural edit, yes. Starting with a blank page, no.

At this level of indulgence – where I sport in a sandbox full of toys I didn’t pay for – any folk tale is fun to retell, no matter how well-known, well worn, or even worn out it may be. I will happily find ways to retell Red Riding Hood or Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Little Hare 2015), for example, so that the protagonists’ motivations are a little more twisted and the endings a little more dissonant than the originals were intended to be. But I am most happy when I play with tales that are less well-known. Lesser-known tales offer adventures into the complete unknown, into scenarios that often are decidedly peculiar, and acquaint us with erratic, eccentric and psychopathic characters whose behaviours require not a little agility of invention to render them narratively plausible, at least to the contemporary reader.

Most importantly of all, lesser-known traditional tales offer ranges and nuances of emotion rarely encountered in the accepted folk-tale canon. Self-delusion, psychosis, braggadocio, falsehood, vaulting ambition, errant foolishness, unassuageable guilt … such riches for those who care to dig them out! When Einstein declared that if we wanted more intelligent children we should read them more fairy tales, he must surely have been talking about this breadth and depth and richness of emotional experience that traditional tales offer.

It was in this vein of seeking emotional breadth that I sourced the stories for The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear. They are decidedly gritty, if not downright harsh and violent. The bad guys sometimes win, the good guys are sometimes bad, and the really bad guys are really bad in cruel, underhanded and unpunished ways. These elements remain in my retelling. They are perhaps even highlighted, as a result of being woven into a theme of psychological danger in friendship. I’ve deliberately drawn a dark, dark world, but also hope I have suggested the warmth of sun gleaming through the clouds. Bear’s deep and simple wisdom, Fox’s contrition and fundamental loyalty, the unspoken love that reverberates between them even in estrangement … each of these, and more, suggests that even in our own confusing world, forgiveness, love and loyalty offer ongoing understanding and hope.”

Margrete Lamond © 2018

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Margrete Lamond is a publisher of Little Hare Books in Australia, author of many modern re-tellings of traditional tales.  She is passionate believer in quality artwork in books for young readers.

Heather Vallance is a studio artist who has taught in remote communities in Australia and regional schools and galleries.

If you would like to find out more visit www.oldbarnbooks.com With thanks to Old Barn Books for sending me this book to review and Liz Scott for organising this guest blog.

Guest blog: James Brown, illustrator of Al’s Awesome Science.

How many times have you opened a book and marvelled at the illustrations inside?  I often do and feel somewhat envious of someone who can pick up a pencil, pen or paintbrush and create a little bit of magic, bringing to life an authors’ words! AAS_CVR_WEB

James Brown is just such a person and his delightful illustrations in Al’s Awesome Science: Egg-speriments! written by Jane Clarke demonstrate how words and pictures work together to capture the imagination.

Today on the blog, James is sharing his experiences of working on Al’s Awesome Science and insight into his illustration techniques. Welcome to the blog James!

 

“Pictures don’t just trigger the imagination, they fire it up. And in particular for the Al’s Awesome Science series, which features lots of science experiments for young readers to try at home, it was important to get things ‘spot on’. How else could readers give the experiments a go? I think that’s what drew me most to it – the buoyancy, the action and how to convey this visually to readers.

I remember as a child being a bit disappointed when images were repeated in books or when there were insufficient drawings. Al’s Awesome Science is filled with pictures of all the key hilarious moments in the story, but the series also allows for the ‘extras’ – awesome facts and experiments – the refreshing bits and bobs which the designer Becky places so quirkily throughout each book. I admit the experiment pages bring out the kid in me. I like doing them snappily, like I used to do in my homework diary at school. I was forever doodling. I used to Tipp-Ex the inside lid of my pencil case and draw repeatedly on it. Once it was filled, I’d blob over it and start again. If it was a caricature of the teacher I could always hide the evidence!

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When I’m out and about, especially on trains, I love using sketchbooks. I’ve got lots of Moleskin ones, a different colour per project. But, I confess that, in the main, when I’m working up an idea, character or spread, I use everyday plain A4 white paper – and reams of it!  Squiggle, scratch, swirl, sweep. I’m not sure how many other illustrators do this, but I also enjoy sketching in biro first. It’s all about getting the right shape and movement – those ‘unprecious’ sketches and scorings loosen up my initial drawings. Now I understand why editors always jump to the back of portfolios to find the sketchy stuff!

 

Then, from this sketchy beginning, I start refining, trying to retain some of that initial energy. I think that’s why my other favourite stage is watercolour (which I save ‘til last). No matter how adept you might think you are, watercolour has its own mind and it can sometimes surprise you. Often the happy accidents are the ones that add more character, either to clothing or backgrounds.

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Using my lightbox really helps to overlay and position. I do less-rough roughs on my iPad, using Procreate, then crayon, watercolour and gouache for the finals. I always aim to do the final artwork in character batches, for continuity, and have whole afternoons or evenings on just one person. You really get to ‘know’ them that way!

Sometimes characters pop up first time around. Einstein, for instance, is very similar to the first sketch I drew. I was given free rein, which is always exciting. I knew he had to be big, hairy and animated. Immediately I thought of THE Einstein and gave him a big, bushy moustache and scraggly hair. The lolling tongue and sideways eyes gave him just the look I was after. Mr Boffin is basically me (if I ate my spinach, drank umpteen protein shakes and actually went to the gym, that is). Mrs Good is a take on my mum (sorry, Mum!). But Mr Good, who was a little portly at first, took a bit of slimming down… The twins Lottie and Al were a little too old at first but soon lost a couple of years.

The freedom to try things out has been the most splendid aspect of illustrating this series. It’s very much a two-way conversation between me and the creative team. We always bounce ideas back and forth! I think flexibility and being open to ideas is important. My editor Natascha even sends me videos of her son doing the experiments! Then, BINGO! I can picture it and so too (hopefully) can the young scientists reading it with their own sketches and diagrams and oodles of doodles.

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Al’s Awesome Science: Egg-speriments! by Jane Clarke, illustrated by James Brown is out now, £6.99 paperback (published by Five Quills). Look out for more fun and experiments with Al and Lottie in book two, Splash Down!, coming spring 2018!

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With thanks to Catherine Ward and Five Quills for sending me this book to review. Find out more about the illustrator at www.jamesbrownillustration.com.

Guest blog: Mixing Fact and Fiction by Jane Clarke

I’m delighted to welcome Jane Clarke to the blog today, author of Al’s Awesome Science: Egg-speriments, a brilliant new series of science-based adventures for younger readers.  Whether they are budding scientists or maybe are just curious about how the world works, this series is sure to entertain them. Full of great characters (I particularly love Einstein the dog!), wonderful illustrations by James Brown and of course, super science experiments that can easily be tried at home, Al’s Awesome Science is a fantastic blend of fact and fiction. Jane, an award winning author of over 80 children’s books, is sharing today how she achieves this.  Welcome to the blog Jane!

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“In the Al’s Awesome Science books, I aim to write a great story, filled with fun science facts and experiments, that’s an entertaining read regardless of how much the reader knows about the subject. Continue reading