Guest blog: Margrete Lamond on The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear


The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear by Margrete Lamond, illustrated by Heather Vallance is a quirky, bittersweet tale of friendship.  It stands out for its slightly darker tone and not necessarily happy ‘ending’ rather like one of Aesop’s fables – but perhaps give a more lifelike picture of how some friendships really can be.  In this story accompanied by stunning charcoal illustrations, Fox and Bear fall out, with Fox being a cunning trickster and Bear falling for his ploys – again and again. Bear realises he too can play the trickster and he sets about to teach Fox a lesson. Hare and Rooster join in with their opinions on Fox’s trickery giving Bear even more desire to get back at Fox.  But as you might imagine, Bear doesn’t feel quite so good afterwards and wonders if he made the right decision…..

Children are often far more intelligent and resilient than they’re given credit for and I can imagine many heartfelt and heated opinions if you read this aloud to your class. The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear takes off the rose-tinted glasses and shows how sometimes ‘friends’ can be mean, sometimes they can let us down and sometimes we can let our friends down. Perhaps the point about being friends is accepting friendship won’t always be perfect and that forgiveness is central to ensure its longevity.  Margrete Lamond

Today to share more insight into to the inspiration behind this story, I’m really pleased to welcome to the blog author Margrete Lamond, who I am sure will have you reaching for your copy to re read or ordering one from the bookshop immediately! Welcome to the blog Margrete!

“The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear is an aggregate of several Norwegian folk-tales. It is also a mash-up of scenarios, an introduction of unrelated characters and relationships, and a reinvention of the motivations of the main players Bear, Fox, Rooster and Hare. Each borrowed tale, and each character, has been twisted, moulded, pummelled and reshaped. Even so, the original sources remain clear.

I can’t resist retelling a folk tale. Retelling, for me, is the ultimate writerly indulgence. The bones of the story have been established and much of the brain-grinding groundwork has already been done. All I need do is sit down and play with language, sentences, patterns and rhythms and sounds, invest the story with an uneasy voice, suggest a disturbing undertow and – O ultimate joy – craft an ambiguous ending. Not to mention play around with the hopes, desires and motivations of the characters. All this, without once having to agonise over fundamental plotting. Tweaking, yes. Retelling, yes. Giving the original tales a thoroughgoing structural edit, yes. Starting with a blank page, no.

At this level of indulgence – where I sport in a sandbox full of toys I didn’t pay for – any folk tale is fun to retell, no matter how well-known, well worn, or even worn out it may be. I will happily find ways to retell Red Riding Hood or Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Little Hare 2015), for example, so that the protagonists’ motivations are a little more twisted and the endings a little more dissonant than the originals were intended to be. But I am most happy when I play with tales that are less well-known. Lesser-known tales offer adventures into the complete unknown, into scenarios that often are decidedly peculiar, and acquaint us with erratic, eccentric and psychopathic characters whose behaviours require not a little agility of invention to render them narratively plausible, at least to the contemporary reader.

Most importantly of all, lesser-known traditional tales offer ranges and nuances of emotion rarely encountered in the accepted folk-tale canon. Self-delusion, psychosis, braggadocio, falsehood, vaulting ambition, errant foolishness, unassuageable guilt … such riches for those who care to dig them out! When Einstein declared that if we wanted more intelligent children we should read them more fairy tales, he must surely have been talking about this breadth and depth and richness of emotional experience that traditional tales offer.

It was in this vein of seeking emotional breadth that I sourced the stories for The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear. They are decidedly gritty, if not downright harsh and violent. The bad guys sometimes win, the good guys are sometimes bad, and the really bad guys are really bad in cruel, underhanded and unpunished ways. These elements remain in my retelling. They are perhaps even highlighted, as a result of being woven into a theme of psychological danger in friendship. I’ve deliberately drawn a dark, dark world, but also hope I have suggested the warmth of sun gleaming through the clouds. Bear’s deep and simple wisdom, Fox’s contrition and fundamental loyalty, the unspoken love that reverberates between them even in estrangement … each of these, and more, suggests that even in our own confusing world, forgiveness, love and loyalty offer ongoing understanding and hope.”

Margrete Lamond © 2018


Margrete Lamond is a publisher of Little Hare Books in Australia, author of many modern re-tellings of traditional tales.  She is passionate believer in quality artwork in books for young readers.

Heather Vallance is a studio artist who has taught in remote communities in Australia and regional schools and galleries.

If you would like to find out more visit With thanks to Old Barn Books for sending me this book to review and Liz Scott for organising this guest blog.

Blog tour: Kaya’s Heart Song by Diwa Tharan Sanders & Nerina Canzi


Kaya’s Heart Song by Diwa Tharan Sanders and Nerina Canzi 

Kaya is looking for her heart song – the song that happy hearts sing. Her search takes her on a journey deep into the jungle where a broken down carousel waits for a very special song to make it turn again…

I’m thrilled to be hosting this stop on the blog tour for Kaya’s Heart Song by Diwa Tharan Sanders, illustrated by Nerina Canzi. This beautifully illustrated and joyous story focuses on Kaya’s adventure to find her heart song and share her magical journey with all around her! I’m talking to the author Diwa Tharan Sanders, a Malaysian author of Indian-Filipino heritage. At a young age, Diwa discovered that writing gave her the freedom to be as bold, funny or as clever as she dared. As an adult, Diwa finds newfound freedom in using heart and spirit to capture the minds and imaginations of young readers everywhere.

Congratulations on your beautiful story Kaya’s Heart SongTell us about your inspiration for writing it.  For as long as I can remember, I’ve always wanted to write a children’s book that delivered an inspirational message in a manner that children could related to. I also felt that in order to do so, I had to tap into my own inner child to tell a story that was either from experience or close to my heart. Kaya’s Heart Song is a reflection of both these things. At the time of writing, I was going through a re-birth of careers, if you like. I had moved out of the city, left the 9-to-5 grind and suddenly found myself with the time and space to do everything and also nothing. Having this luxury and freedom was in itself a journey of self-discovery and so when I started writing this story (it’s actually the fourth in a series of other stories I had written about Kaya), I poured what I was experiencing at the time into it. And through this process of discovering my own heart song, Kaya’s Heart Song came to form. Because I was living on a beautiful tropical island and spending my time in amongst trees and nature these elements were naturally reflected in my book.

The story is centred on the ideas of mindfulness and how to get to a place of self-awareness. Why did you want to write about this for children? It’s interesting that the idea of mindfulness is the centre of my book as that was not my original intention. I wanted to tell a story of being true to your heart and following the beat of your own drum. And in that process and I suppose as I fell into my own heart’s desires in order to write the book, this story about mindfulness revealed itself. I think it’s wonderful for children to have an awareness of being mindful because it’s important for everyone to make a conscious choice to slow down, take a breath and just allow – anything and everything to be. Anything cultivated from a young age, usually continues as we grow and so learning about mindfulness – whether its about being able to acknowledge how you’re feelings in the present moment, observing the present moment in silence, or pausing to take a few deep breaths – are all powerful tools that keep us grounded, balanced and more connected to ourselves.

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The magical elephant carousel is beautiful! Is there significance in choosing elephants for the children to ride on? I’m glad you think so! I love it too, Nerina did a wonderful job. Well, I chose to include elephants because I love them. We have elephants in Malaysia and to me, they symbolise strength, wisdom and protection. Carousels have always reminded me of my childhood; they’re fun, magical and whimsical. So marrying these two seemed like an appropriate way to introduce elements that reminded me of the joys of being a young child, while keeping an Asian relevance to the story.

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Your story is brought to life with amazing illustrations. Tell us about working with an illustrator. I cannot begin to tell you how much I love Nerina’s illustrations. As a first-time author, I feel incredibly lucky to have been paired with such an amazing illustrator. Nerina truly brought magic to my words through her illustrations. The process was very smooth and such a delight, to be honest. Once we had Kaya’s character nailed down, every single drawing that I saw after was truly so spot on, so beautiful and so special. I was in tears when I saw the first few illustrations, because she captured the essence of Kaya and the story so perfectly, I couldn’t have dreamed it better myself. I loved working with Nerina and although we haven’t even met in person (yet!) I feel like I’ve built a connection with her through this process.

I noticed in the dedication you mention your father and reading. Can you tell us about the stories you enjoyed as a child? Wow, this question is taking me a long way back! Well, I spent most of my formative years in Boston, Massachusetts so I guess my favourite books are flavoured by growing up there.

I enjoyed reading stories about characters that were uncommon or not people, who were curious and courageous and anything that was set in nature and had adventure, magic or human relationships (although I didn’t really understand them at that age) in them. Some of my favourite stories growing up in Boston include Curious George, Bread and Jam for Frances, The Little House, Strega Nona and Where The Wild Things Are.

It’s wonderful to hear the story behind Kaya’s Heart Song and your inspiration and experience as a writer.  Thank you and we wish you every success with Kaya!


For more information please visit

With thanks to Lantana Publishing for inviting me to participate in this blog tour! Discover the rest of the tour on these brilliant blogs:



Book of the Month: Fabio The World’s Greatest Flamingo Detective: The Case of the Missing Hippo by Laura James

book of the monthWhat a gorgeous book!  I opened the package from Bloomsbury and out fell this fabulous illustrated chapter book.  You can’t help but fall in love with Fabio the flamingo, a brand new character from author Laura James (who writes the Adventures of Pug series) with fabulous illustrations by Emily Fox!


Fabio The World’s Greatest Flamingo Detective: The Case of the Missing Hippo by Laura James, illustrated by Emily Fox

Fabio, the world’s greatest flamingo detective, just wants to sit on the veranda of the Hotel Royale and drink pink lemonade, not judge the local talent show.  But when Julia the jazz-singing hippo disappears from the stage, Fabio knows he’s been served a tall, refreshing glass of crime.

This first story in the series sees Fabio the flamingo on the case of finding a missing hippo of all things.  Having been roped into judging the local talent contest, Fabio uses his detective skills to find out just who is behind the disappearance, all the while hearing the many and varied talents of the local residents of Lake Laloozee!  Aided by his somewhat hapless assistant, a giraffe called Gilbert who loves to be helpful and put on a disguise, Fabio cleverly weaves his way through the suspects to find out who kidnapped the star-songstress Julia.  It seems nearly everyone has a motive, but Fabio is not one to give up easily and notices everything – after all he’s the world’s greatest flamingo detective!

I thoroughly enjoyed this story, which had echoes of many of my favourite detective novels.  A convincing setting; a fantastic cast of characters from moody hotel owner Smith the vulture to the fabulous jazz band trio of crocodiles Kevin, Delilah and Tiny Bob; and plenty of suspects – this read like an Agatha Christie for kids! The imaginative plot will keep young readers guessing and laughing out loud; especially where Gilbert the Giraffe is concerned.  I absolutely loved the artwork and three colour illustrations throughout, bringing to life the animals and their various personalities. Fabio, of course, is the favourite – who knew a flamingo could be so suave and sophisticated?! The culprit is of course caught but it’s a suitably happy ending with the world’s greatest detective in charge! I absolutely cannot wait for the next adventure and am sure this series will be a hit with young readers far and wide.



Find out more at and

With thanks to Bloomsbury for sending me this book to review!


Winter wonderland….. 5 sleeps to go!

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Two more lovely picture books join the winter wonderland line up , with jut under a week to go until the big day! A crazy canine countdown and a magical journey to celebrate family at Christmas time.




The Twelve Dogs of Christmas by Alison Ritchie and Marisa Morea

A little puppy is caught up in the countdown to Christmas as dogs of all manner, shape and sizes ‘help’ to get everything ready. From choosing the tree, to baking cakes, to running off with festive treats, the dogs are having a wonderful time.  With Chihuahuas, Retrievers, Scottie dogs and Dalmatians there’s a dog for every person – and a task for every dog!

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A great picture book for all dog lovers this is a lovely rhyming treat, reflecting on the fabulous chaos of getting ready for Christmas.  It captures the fun, excitement and just how much we can all get carried away!  Taking inspiration from the traditional Twelve Days of Christmas, this would be a great book to read aloud.  There’s lots to see with lively and colourful illustrations, bringing to life all the different festive traditions from decorating the tree to wrapping presents to preparing food. With lots of excited little ones counting down to Christmas, it’s the perfect time to share this story.

Find out more at and


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Last Stop on the Reindeer Express by Maudie Powell-Tuck and Karl James Mountford

A young girl, Mia, misses her Daddy as Christmas approaches and even the sights and sounds at the Christmas market don’t make her feel more festive.  Mia can’t get the Christmas card she has made him delivered on time, but when she discovers a magical post box that leads her to the Reindeer Express, it seems her Christmas wish may come true.  Mia is taken by a magical reindeer on a fantastic journey over land and sea to meet a very special person and deliver her card!  When Mia has to leave her father the sky is filled with other children on their own reindeer and she understands she is not the only one missing a family member.  This helps Mia and whilst her Daddy can’t spend Christmas at home, she discovers she is brave enough to be without him.

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This is a beautiful book full of heart-warming, magical illustrations with a lovely message about families at Christmas time.  A simple narrative that even young children will relate to conveys the story, with the added magic and wonder of the festive season. Whilst we can’t always be with all of our loved ones at Christmas, knowing we’re not alone makes it easier and we can still enjoy celebrating.  With lots of lovely illustrations to look at and lift the flaps and cut-outs, Last Stop on the Reindeer Express celebrates Christmas and family perfectly.

Find out more and


With thanks to Simon and Schuster and Little Tiger Press for sending me these books to review.

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Winter wonderland…..13 sleeps to go!

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Looking for some festive cheer on a damp winter’s day? Look no further than these two gorgeous rhyming stories from Nosy Crow, which are sure to put a smile on your face.  Each one comes with a free Stories aloud smartphone audio book, so they can be enjoyed again and again even if you’re on the move, so quite handy for Christmas travels!



Oliver Elephant by Lou Peacock, illustrated by Helen Stephens

Noah is going Christmas shopping with his Mummy and baby sister, Evie-May.  He takes Oliver Elephant with him to help and has a wonderful time playing all around the store while Mummy chooses presents.  When it’s time to go, after a special treat of a nice piece of cake, Oliver Elephant is nowhere to be seen! Noah and Mummy look everywhere, but it’s baby sister Evie-May who finds the missing Elephant. And they even remember to get the Christmas star for the tree – thank goodness for that!

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Young readers are bound to enjoy this festive story which celebrates the everyday life of little ones at Christmas time.

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The lovely rhyming narrative and gorgeous illustrations capture the magic and busyness of festive shopping, the mishaps that can occur and the love that children have for their family – and their soft toys! A real treat to read aloud, Oliver Elephant is a perfect bedtime story for Christmas.



The Princess and the Christmas Rescue by Caryl Hart, illustrated by Sarah Warburton

Princess Eliza loves to invent things, but her parents the King and Queen want her to do something more ‘Princess-like’ and find a friend to play with. So Princess Eliza tries her best, but no amount of frog kissing, making gingerbread or waiting for a Prince to rescue her seems to work! Soon she discovers she’s not the only one in need and sets about using her brilliant inventions to help none other than Santa and his elves. Before she knows it, Princess Eliza has made a whole workshop of friends and helped save Christmas. What could be better than that?!

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This is an absolute festive delight!  The rhyming narrative skips through this charming story with amusing references to well- known fairy tales. Princess Eliza is a wonderful, industrious heroine who I’m sure anyone who’s ever enjoyed making things will identify with.

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Lovely, bright and detailed illustrations bring to life the magical workshop and all it’s inhabitants and of course, the wonder of Christmas!  Another fantastic book to read aloud that will have young readers reaching for their craft box.


Find out more at and

With thanks to Nosy Crow for sending me these books to review.

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Winter wonderland….18 sleeps to go!

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Two very different animals feature in our next winter wonderland installment. Whilst not strictly festive (apart from the snow!), both books have wonderful themes of being brave and celebrating friendship and would make lovely gifts at Christmas time!




Don’t Leap, Larry! by John Briggs, illustrated by Nicola Slater

You can’t help but fall a little in love with Larry the lemming.  He is bold and fearless and unlike his fellow lemmings, loves to be different and think for himself.  From going sledging with the puffins to choosing his own very brilliant name (everyone else is just called lemming!) he stands out from the crowd. So much so in fact he decides to see if he’ll fit in better with another group of animals – but nothing works – especially not the polar bears!  Finally, Larry returns home only to discover he can help his fellow lemmings think for themselves just like he does.


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This is a gorgeous story. Funny and heart-warming with a few thrills and spills to boot, it will have all readers cheering for Larry and eventually, the other lemmings too. Brilliantly drawn by Nicola Slater, it’s a joyful story with a wonderful message about being brave, standing out from the crowd and not worrying about thinking differently.

Find out more at and

Published by Pavilion Books 




The Snow Lion by Jim Helmore and Richard Jones

This is a lovely tale about a little girl who needs a friend and some courage. Who better to help her than The Snow Lion? Caro and her mum have moved home and Caro is just a little bit lost in her new surroundings of bare white walls and no one to play with. As if by magic, a beautiful big white lion appears and soon Caro has made a new friend with whom she can play all day!  And not only does he stop her from being lonely, the Snow Lion helps her find the courage to go outside and make new friends. As the gentle narrative unfolds, Caro’s new home isn’t so lonely anymore; it’s filled with colour – and friends! The Snow Lion quietly leaves but Caro will always know where to look for him…


Text and wonderful illustrations come together perfectly to create a charmingly touching story young readers will want to visit again and again.  I loved the beautifully described friendship between the Snow Lion and Caro, and how he gently and ever so kindly encourages her to be brave. It’s reassuring to know that sometimes we all need a little comfort and how it’s very often finding a friend in unexpected places that can be just the thing!

Find out more and

Published by Simon & Schuster



With thanks to Pavilion Books and Simon & Schuster for sending me these books to review!

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Winter wonderland…20 sleeps till Christmas!

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With only twenty sleeps to go till Christmas Day, it’s really starting to feel festive! For the next few weeks in the run up to Christmas I’ll be featuring some gorgeous wintry and festive stories on the blog. Today we’re exploring some snowy landscapes!

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Up and Down: A Walk in the Countryside with Nosy Crow and The National Trust, beautifully illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw, takes young readers on a walk through a snow covered landscape introducing them to the idea of opposites.

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Two little walkers explore the woods and discover ‘up and down’, near and far and many other ‘opposites’, all the while enjoying getting close to nature.


Young readers will love to spot the various animals who live in the woods and all manner of festive creatures. There’s even a snowman!  This is a great addition to the A Walk in the Countryside board book series and will have everyone wishing for snow!

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Another wintry landscape is stunningly brought to life in this beautiful exploration of winter; Little Hazelnut by Anne-Florence Lemasson and Dominique Ehrhard. I literally gasped when I opened this book – there’s something utterly magical about pop-up books.  Books like this make me love them even more! Little Hazelnut takes the reader on a journey with a variety of animals and birds venturing into the garden during winter.

Each page features a different animal pop up, with a charming narrative capturing the variety of life that appears in a garden in winter. The blue-tit is my favourite – just gorgeous! Simple but detailed, the artwork shows even the animals’ footprints as they navigate the snowy landscape. Little Hazelnut is an absolute delight and would make a lovely gift at Christmas time.

Find out more at Old Barn Books.


With thanks to Nosy Crow and Old Barn Books for sending me these books to review.

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