New reviews: five great reads!

I’ve read some fantastic books over the last few weeks.  Here are my highlights of brilliant middle grade and YA reads which are available now, written by brilliant authors who know just how to get children and young people reading whether through fascinating facts, humour and adventure, teen romance or important issues.

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The Secret Diary of Thomas Snoop Tudor Boy Spy by Philip Ardagh and illustrated by Jamie Littler

Thomas Snoop is in training to become a spy. Entrusted with a top secret mission by the mysterious Lord Severn, right-hand man to the Tudor king, Thomas must travel to the magnificent Goldenhilt Hall – in the guise of a servant – in order to uncover traitors plotting against the crown. It will take all Thomas’s wits and cunning to uncover the traitors lurking at Goldenhilt Hall – and he must do so without being discovered himself…

I’ve read and enjoyed the previous books in this series and this new book doesn’t disappoint. With Philip Ardagh’s trademark wit and hilarity, we discover all about Tudor times through the eyes of Thomas Snoop and his diary entries. Mystery abounds as Thomas attempts to complete his mission and uncover the dastardly treacherous villains who threaten to destroy English freedom! I love Jamie Littler’s illustrating style, complimenting the narrative with humorous takes on the larger than life characters.  Historical facts appear throughout the story, making Tudor Boy Spy informative and fun! This great series introduces history in an accessible way, encouraging young readers to think what life might have been like growing up in a different time period – with the added bonus of being really funny!

Philip Ardagh has written many children’s books and is best known for his Grubtown Tales for which he won the Roald Dahl Funny Prize.  Jamie Littler is an illustrator whose books include Hamish and the World Stoppers, a bestselling debut of 2015.

Find out more at www.nosycrow.com

The Chocolate Factory Ghost by David O’Connell illustrated by Clare Powellchoc ghost

Archie McBudge knows his lucky underpants must really work, because when he and his mum are summoned to Honeystone Hall in the remote Scottish village of Dundoodle, they find Archie has inherited not only the enormous hall, but the whole of the world-famous McBudge Confectionery Company from Great-Uncle Archibald. That’s a new home, a fortune and a lifetime’s supply of treats rolled into one! But all is not well in Dundoodle, and when Archie reads the mysterious letter his great-uncle left him, he finds himself on a quest to save his family’s company from ruin. With the help of his new friends Fliss and Billy, Archie has to try to figure out the puzzles of Honeystone before his sweet future melts away like an ice lolly in the sun!

I absolutely loved this story! Full of adventure, heart and humour I defy anyone to read this and not laugh out loud, whilst craving the wonderful fudge creations described. A fantastic balance of mystery, fantasy, devious villains and a trio of heroes, the plot keeps you guessing until the final pages. Set in the wilds of Scotland, the landscape springs to life and soon enough, Archie finds himself wading deeper into the secrets of Dundoodle. He makes a fine, hugely likeable hero ably supported by Fliss and Billy and you are rooting for them throughout. With strange creatures, relatives plotting revenge and of course, lots and lots of sugary treats, The Chocolate Factory Ghost really is a great middle grade read and definitely one of my favourites so far this year.

I read a proof copy of this book so haven’t seen the illustrations but if the cover is anything to go by I’m sure they’re fantastic! David O’Connell is a writer and illustrator from South London and works mostly in children’s books.  Claire Powell is an illustrator and designer whose short animation The Scapegoat won an award at the British Animation Film Festival 2015.

Find out more www.bloomsbury.com

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How to Bee by Bren MacDibble

How to Bee is set in a future where there are no bees and children are employed to scramble through the fruit trees with feather wands.  Peony wants to be a bee, a hand pollinator; she’s light, she’s fast, and even though she’s a year too young, she’s going to be the best bee the farm has ever seen…except when you’re only nine years old it’s hard to get everyone around you to go along with your plan.

How to Bee is a compelling middle grade story set in a dystopian future that feels all too plausible. You can feel the heat, dust and humidity of the Australian farm on which the story is set and sadly imagine a world where bees no longer exist and pollination has to be done by hand. Featuring a bold and fierce heroine named Peony, who’s bravery is admirable in the face of true adversity,  How to Bee is a fast-moving story, full of heart rending moments. Taken unwillingly from her home, Peony’s struggles are frequent but she doesn’t lose heart and her determination to get back to her Grandfather and sister is palpable. Even in the most unpleasant of situations, Peony keeps her desire for freedom in sight, making friends in the most unexpected of places. It’s a story full of hope and courage, thankfully (spoiler alert) with a happy ending; but also a stark warning for those who ignore the plight of the diminishing bee population. After reading How to Bee, when you next see bees buzzing around the garden you’ll look at them with new eyes and Peony’s story will stay with you long after the final page.

Bren MacDibble was raised on farms all over New Zealand and now lives in Melbourne. How to Bee has been shortlisted for several awards and is Bren’s first children’s novel to be available in the UK.

Find out more www.oldbarnbooks.com 

Truly Wildly Deeply by Jenny McLachlantruly wildy deeply.jpg

Freedom matters to Annie. She has cerebral palsy and she’s had to fight hard to get the world to see her for who she truly is.  Annie is starting college.She can’t wait. No more school, no more uniform and no one telling her what to do. Its the start of a new adventure and Annie’s not going to let anyone or anything get in the way of that…

There’s something wonderful about coming back to a character you love. This story features the fabulous feisty Annie from Stargazing for Beginners – and she’s even better this time around! We meet her just as she’s going to college, determined to make her own way as ever despite her disability. Annie is a force to be reckoned with but she experiences the perils of teenage life just like anyone else. Making new friends, finding her way round a new campus, dealing with family and of course, finding romance. We see new insight into what makes Annie tick and meet the absolutely wonderful character of Fab, in whom Annie may have met her match. Truly Wildly Deeply is a gorgeous tale with a gorgeous heroine, who springs to life, inspires with her everyday courage and brings a smile to your face with her wit and wisdom! It’s a fantastic story by one of my favourite writers for young people – read it; you won’t be disappointed!

Jenny McLachlan worked as an English teacher before becoming a full-time writer in 2014. She has written fantastic books for young people including the Ladybirdz series and Stargazing for Beginners.

Find out more www.bloomsbury.com

tenderTender by Eve Ainsworth

Marty and Daisy spend their lives pretending. Marty pretends his Mum’s grip on reality isn’t slipping by the day.  Daisy pretends her parents aren’t exhausting themselves while they look after her brother. They both pretend they’re fine. That everything is fine.  But the thing about pretending is, at some point, it has to stop. And then what?

Another gritty, but ultimately uplifting story from Eve Ainsworth, who writes with such insight into the problems some young people experience today. The two protagonists face extreme difficulties in their lives, both affected by a family member suffering from debilitating illness. Daisy adores her brother but his health problems take their toll on everything in her life no matter how hard she tries to cope. Marty doesn’t want any help looking after his Mum and he certainly doesn’t want to attend some youth group for people ‘like him’.  When Daisy and Marty meet, as well as dealing with everyday teenage troubles, the cracks in their ability to deal with things at home start to show.  You can totally understand why they are drawn to each other and as the story unfolds, they find hope in new friendship.  Tender is a compelling read, with characters you really care about. Supported by an Arts Council award, the novel focuses on important issues that many will relate to, raising the profile of problems around at mental health and young carers.  I read it in one sitting and would highly recommend this YA read.

Eve Ainsworth has written several YA novels focused on issues affecting young people. Her work in pastoral care in schools has given her a real insight to the needs of teenagers and a desire to raise awareness of the things that matter to them.

Find out more at www.scholastic.com

With thanks to Bloomsbury, Nosy Crow, Old Barn Books, and Scholastic for sending me these books to review!

Guest blog: Margrete Lamond on The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear

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The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear by Margrete Lamond, illustrated by Heather Vallance is a quirky, bittersweet tale of friendship.  It stands out for its slightly darker tone and not necessarily happy ‘ending’ rather like one of Aesop’s fables – but perhaps give a more lifelike picture of how some friendships really can be.  In this story accompanied by stunning charcoal illustrations, Fox and Bear fall out, with Fox being a cunning trickster and Bear falling for his ploys – again and again. Bear realises he too can play the trickster and he sets about to teach Fox a lesson. Hare and Rooster join in with their opinions on Fox’s trickery giving Bear even more desire to get back at Fox.  But as you might imagine, Bear doesn’t feel quite so good afterwards and wonders if he made the right decision…..

Children are often far more intelligent and resilient than they’re given credit for and I can imagine many heartfelt and heated opinions if you read this aloud to your class. The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear takes off the rose-tinted glasses and shows how sometimes ‘friends’ can be mean, sometimes they can let us down and sometimes we can let our friends down. Perhaps the point about being friends is accepting friendship won’t always be perfect and that forgiveness is central to ensure its longevity.  Margrete Lamond

Today to share more insight into to the inspiration behind this story, I’m really pleased to welcome to the blog author Margrete Lamond, who I am sure will have you reaching for your copy to re read or ordering one from the bookshop immediately! Welcome to the blog Margrete!

“The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear is an aggregate of several Norwegian folk-tales. It is also a mash-up of scenarios, an introduction of unrelated characters and relationships, and a reinvention of the motivations of the main players Bear, Fox, Rooster and Hare. Each borrowed tale, and each character, has been twisted, moulded, pummelled and reshaped. Even so, the original sources remain clear.

I can’t resist retelling a folk tale. Retelling, for me, is the ultimate writerly indulgence. The bones of the story have been established and much of the brain-grinding groundwork has already been done. All I need do is sit down and play with language, sentences, patterns and rhythms and sounds, invest the story with an uneasy voice, suggest a disturbing undertow and – O ultimate joy – craft an ambiguous ending. Not to mention play around with the hopes, desires and motivations of the characters. All this, without once having to agonise over fundamental plotting. Tweaking, yes. Retelling, yes. Giving the original tales a thoroughgoing structural edit, yes. Starting with a blank page, no.

At this level of indulgence – where I sport in a sandbox full of toys I didn’t pay for – any folk tale is fun to retell, no matter how well-known, well worn, or even worn out it may be. I will happily find ways to retell Red Riding Hood or Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Little Hare 2015), for example, so that the protagonists’ motivations are a little more twisted and the endings a little more dissonant than the originals were intended to be. But I am most happy when I play with tales that are less well-known. Lesser-known tales offer adventures into the complete unknown, into scenarios that often are decidedly peculiar, and acquaint us with erratic, eccentric and psychopathic characters whose behaviours require not a little agility of invention to render them narratively plausible, at least to the contemporary reader.

Most importantly of all, lesser-known traditional tales offer ranges and nuances of emotion rarely encountered in the accepted folk-tale canon. Self-delusion, psychosis, braggadocio, falsehood, vaulting ambition, errant foolishness, unassuageable guilt … such riches for those who care to dig them out! When Einstein declared that if we wanted more intelligent children we should read them more fairy tales, he must surely have been talking about this breadth and depth and richness of emotional experience that traditional tales offer.

It was in this vein of seeking emotional breadth that I sourced the stories for The Sorry Tale of Fox and Bear. They are decidedly gritty, if not downright harsh and violent. The bad guys sometimes win, the good guys are sometimes bad, and the really bad guys are really bad in cruel, underhanded and unpunished ways. These elements remain in my retelling. They are perhaps even highlighted, as a result of being woven into a theme of psychological danger in friendship. I’ve deliberately drawn a dark, dark world, but also hope I have suggested the warmth of sun gleaming through the clouds. Bear’s deep and simple wisdom, Fox’s contrition and fundamental loyalty, the unspoken love that reverberates between them even in estrangement … each of these, and more, suggests that even in our own confusing world, forgiveness, love and loyalty offer ongoing understanding and hope.”

Margrete Lamond © 2018

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Margrete Lamond is a publisher of Little Hare Books in Australia, author of many modern re-tellings of traditional tales.  She is passionate believer in quality artwork in books for young readers.

Heather Vallance is a studio artist who has taught in remote communities in Australia and regional schools and galleries.

If you would like to find out more visit www.oldbarnbooks.com With thanks to Old Barn Books for sending me this book to review and Liz Scott for organising this guest blog.

New review: The Song from Somewhere Else by A.F. Harrold illustrated by Levi Pinfold

I was delighted to receive the beautiful paperback version of this book holding the wonderfully quirky tale of Frank and Nick and some very strange music.  This is another fantastic story by A.F. Harrold that warms the heart and stirs the imagination, with incredible illustrations by Levi Pinfold.

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The Song from Somewhere Else by A.F .Harrold illustrated by Levi Pinfold

The last person Frank wants to be rescued by is Nick Underbridge. No one likes Nick. He’s big, he’s weird and he smells – or so everyone in Frank’s class thinks.  And yet, there’s something nice about him, and the strange music that plays in his house.  Something that makes Frank feel happy for the first time in forever.  But there’s more to Nick, and to his house, than meets the eye, and soon Frank realises she isn’t the only one keeping secrets. Or the only one who needs help…..

The Song from SomewhereElse is a beautifully written tale about friendship, family and belonging. Frank has suffered at the hands of bullies for as long as she can remember. With a persistently irritating Dad who just doesn’t ‘get’ things and a Mum who is always working, Frank is often on her own trying to avoid the vile Neil Noble and his two cronies, who delight in tormenting her.  One day when the strange and friendless Nick comes to her rescue, a new friendship begins.  This is utterly believable and described with the perfect amount of awkwardness and tentative steps as both Frank and Nick slowly begin to relate to each other. Frank finds herself oddly comforted by Nick and his home, especially when she discovers ethereal music coming from his cellar.  Strange secrets are revealed and while the world around her makes less and less sense, Frank realises she is not the only one who suffers. Her curiosity is palpable and whilst her choices lead to a troubling outcome, you can’t help but empathise with her.

The narrative is gentle but depicts the harsh reality of being bullied and resulting consequences. The beautiful illustrations capture the story’s other-worldliness and the fantasy elements perfectly. I found myself transported into Frank’s adolescent world feeling her worry; her fascination with the music she hears and her constant conscience driving her decisions.   The Song from Somewhere Else weaves a clever plot and at its heart it’s a timeless lyrical story about belonging, friendship and bearing the consequences of our choices.

The Song from Somewhere Else is published by Bloomsbury With thanks to Bloomsbury for sending me this book to review.

Find out more at www.afharroldkids.com and www.levipinfold.com

New review: Sleeper by J D Fennell

This novel had been sat on my to be read pile for some time so I’m glad I finally read it. It’s definitely one to recommend; an edge-of-your seat thriller set in wartime London with plenty of plot twists to keep you guessing.

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Sleeper by J D Fennell

Sixteen-year-old Will Starling is pulled from the sea with no memory of his past. In his blazer is a strange notebook with a bullet lodged inside it: a bullet meant for him. As London prepares for the Blitz, Will soon finds himself pursued by vicious agents and a ruthless killer known as the Pastor. All of them want Will’s notebook and will do anything to get it.

Sleeper is a fantastic gripping read set in World War 2 and featuring a brave hero, Will, who has lost his memory.  The reader is shown the precursor to this memory loss and then follows Will on his journey desperately trying to rediscover who he really is.  Fraught with danger and deception and villains at every corner,  Sleeper is a roller-coaster ride through the streets of wartime London. At every turn Will loses those who want to help him to ruthless killers – in particular the evil Pastor; a quite horrible character! Will follows the only clue he has and ends up at a school for young Mi5 agents in training.

But even then he is not safe and only as he escapes yet another attack does Will find a true ally in the shape of Anna. With her help he begins to understand who he really is and the mission he must complete in order to save, not just himself and Anna, but the whole of London from the Nazis. I enjoyed the wide cast of characters and never knowing quite who was on Will’s side. Weaving history with magical realism and a spy thriller narrative, the story has plenty of fantastic action sequences.  Sleeper has deservedly been nominated for the Amazing Book Awards and I wish the author every success with this fantastic debut novel.

Sleeper is published by the Dome Press. With thanks to The Dome Press for sending me this book to review.

New review: The Land of Neverendings by Kate Saunders

I’ve enjoyed many of Kate Saunders books for children – this one is no exception and I’d thoroughly recommend it. Poignant, heart-warming and full of creativity The Land of Neverendings is a great read.

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The Land of Neverendings by Kate Saunders

The cat flap opened. Emily thought a wild animal was coming into the house. But the muddy creature that climbed through had four little wheels and a tail. It spoke in a voice like rough sandpaper. ‘Come on, you two – it’s nice and warm in here.’ What if there exists a world powered by imagination? A world of silliness, where humans and their toys live on long after they’ve left the Hard World . . . and what if the door between that world and this one was broken? Welcome to the Land of Neverendings.

The Land of Neverendings is moving story about a young girl Emily, whose disabled sister Holly dies, leaving her family bereft and Emily lost in a world of grief and imagination.  I hadn’t been expecting this narrative but the best stories are the ones that surprise you and this one did. I’ve always loved the idea of toys coming to life and being able to chat away with your favourite teddy bear would be just brilliant.  After her sister dies, Emily starts a journal to help her capture her memories; the more she recalls about the fun times she, Holly and Holly’s favourite toy Bluey had, the more the two worlds collide. It seems the magical world Emily created through the stories she told her sister, Smockeroon, really does exists as do the toys that live in it. And somehow the door has opened to this world, something she can only share with her babysitter Ruth, who suddenly finds she can also see and hear the toys.  For Ruth too has lost someone she loves and knows exactly how Emily feels.

The relationship between Emily and Ruth is just lovely. As Emily experiences the varying degrees of sadness, anger and even difficulties with her parents and friends who can’t deal with the death of her sister any more than she can, she is able to share all of this with Ruth who is conveniently on hand with chocolate biscuits and cups of tea. The magical narrative full of original ideas, lightens the story and creates opportunities for lots of laughs. With a host of enchanting characters including the Barbie dolls (hilarious) and soft toys Hugo and Smiffy (gorgeous), the story takes the reader on a wonderful and poignant adventure through a world of imagination.

On a personal note, I lost my eldest sister when I was 19. She too was disabled and her death like the death of any sibling left a huge hole in all of our lives. So I could truly relate to The Land of Neverendings and Emily and her experiences of grief and felt they were handled with the right amount of tenderness and humour.  This middle grade story is a celebration of the power of memory to keep those we love alive – and the power of imagination to bring joy.

The Land of Neverendings is published by Faber & Faber.

 

New reviews: great reads for Spring!

Since starting the New Year as a ‘commuter’ many friends ask me how can I stand it?! Thankfully as a reader, I now have a whole lot more time to read – the perfect activity when you’re stuck on a train, even when there’s delays or no seats! So here’s just three of the six great books I’ve read over the last two weeks (more review to come!):

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I Swapped My Brother on the Internet by Jo Simmons

I can get a new brother? On the internet?’ Jonny muttered. `Oh sweet mangoes of heaven!’ Everyone has dreamed of being able to get rid of their brother or sister at one time or another – but for Jonny, the dream is about to become a reality with SiblingSwap.com! What could be better than someone awesome to replace Ted, Jonny’s obnoxious older brother. But finding the perfect brother isn’t easy, as Jonny discovers when Sibling Swap sends him a line of increasingly bizarre replacements: first a merboy, then a brother raised by meerkats, and then the ghost of Henry the Eighth! What’s coming next?! Suddenly old Ted isn’t looking so bad. But can Jonny ever get him back?

I’m sure many of us have been there – wishing we could somehow magically change our brother or sister who is driving us mad! But perhaps we haven’t all had our wish come true like Jonny. I Swapped My Brother on the Internet is a brilliantly funny tale of getting more than you bargained for – especially when using the internet – and finding out the grass isn’t always greener on the other side. With a thoroughly likeable hero in Jonny and a whole host of hilarious characters, readers will laugh out loud as Jonny works his way through the Sibling Swap replacements – none of whom quite live up to his expectations.  I particularly enjoyed Henry VII’s ghost as a potential new sibling!! Fast paced and full of gags (anyone heard of the Hanging Pants of Doom?!) and with fun, fantastic and lively illustrations, I Swapped My Brother on the Internet is a great read for middle grade children.  And with the added bonus of a positive message about not taking your sibling for granted, this could the answer to solving some of those sibling arguments!

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I Swapped My Brother on the Internet is published Bloomsbury.

Find out more www.bloomsbury.com and www.nathanreedillustration.com

A Taxonomy of Love by Rachael Allen

The moment Spencer meets Hope the summer before seventh g34227670rade, it’s . . . something at first sight. He knows she’s special, possibly even magical. The pair becomes fast friends, climbing trees and planning world travels. After years of being outshone by his older brother and teased because of his Tourette’s syndrome, Spencer finally feels like he belongs. But as Hope and Spencer get older and life gets messier, the clear label of “friend” gets messier, too. Through sibling feuds and family tragedies, new relationships and broken hearts, the two grow together and apart, and Spencer, an aspiring scientist, tries to map it all out using his trusty system of taxonomy. He wants to identify and classify their relationship, but in the end, he finds that life doesn’t always fit into easy-to-manage boxes, and it’s this messy complexity that makes life so rich and beautiful.

A totally enjoyable and at times very moving YA story of friendship, romance, love, family, teenage angst, loss and growing up.  A Taxonomy of Love covers a multitude of experiences reflecting the many and varied struggles that shape our lives.  Spencer is a brave character whose struggles with Tourette’s are well portrayed, creating instant empathy and giving the reader an insight into living with a neurological condition. I loved his use of taxonomy to try and make sense of things. Hope has a wonderful zest for life, which is abruptly altered by unexpected tragedy. Her subsequent self-destruct is painful to observe.   The ‘Will they? Won’t they? thread keeps you hooked – there is joy amidst the heartache and I loved the ending (no spoilers!). Through prose, letters and text conversations over six years, A Taxonomy of Love brings to life the relationship between the two protagonists, Spencer and Hope and their wider family relationships, creating people you care about, are rooting for and feel like you really know.

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A Taxonomy of Love is published by Abrams and Chronicle.

Find out more  rachaelallenwrites.blogspot.co.uk and www.abramsandchronicle.co.uk

 

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Eloise Undercover by Sarah Baker

The door to the library banged open. I looked around for a place to hide, but it was too late. An angry German voice barked an order. Boots clicked on the wooden floor of the corridor as he shouted at someone behind him. He there was a terrible silence. He was here.

It’s 1944 in Nazi-Occupied France.  Eloise’s world is in turmoil and her father is missing. In a world at war who can she trust? What secrets will she discover in the search for her father?

Eloise Undercover is a thrilling middle grade tale of survival, daring deeds and above all, hope in dark times. Living under Nazi occupation brings with it the stark realities of the war; these are dealt with in an age appropriate way, whilst not being made light of. The story features the fantastic location of Maison de Noyer from Sarah Baker’s previous novel Through the Mirror Door (see my review here) which I thought really clever; I love the idea of a house experiencing so much history through the ages. Twelve year old Eloise is a wonderful heroine who has a huge amount of courage and determination. With her father and friends gone, Eloise’s grandmother Amma is the only person left to care for her; but Amma has secrets of her own. Once Eloise uncovers the truth behind her father’s disappearance – that he was in fact part of the resistance – she insists she too can help fight against the Nazis and the adventures begin in earnest. With edge-of-your-seat action, clever plot twists and a cast of characters who embody both the brave and cruel sides of war, Eloise Undercover is a really great read, bringing history to life and reminding us of the importance of hope, trust and friendship.

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Eloise Undercover is published by Catnip Publishing.

Find out more www.bysarahbaker.com and www.bouncemarketing.co.uk

With thanks to Bloomsbury, Abrams and Chronicle and Catnip for sending me these books to review.

Winter wonderland….. 5 sleeps to go!

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Two more lovely picture books join the winter wonderland line up , with jut under a week to go until the big day! A crazy canine countdown and a magical journey to celebrate family at Christmas time.

 

 

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The Twelve Dogs of Christmas by Alison Ritchie and Marisa Morea

A little puppy is caught up in the countdown to Christmas as dogs of all manner, shape and sizes ‘help’ to get everything ready. From choosing the tree, to baking cakes, to running off with festive treats, the dogs are having a wonderful time.  With Chihuahuas, Retrievers, Scottie dogs and Dalmatians there’s a dog for every person – and a task for every dog!

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A great picture book for all dog lovers this is a lovely rhyming treat, reflecting on the fabulous chaos of getting ready for Christmas.  It captures the fun, excitement and just how much we can all get carried away!  Taking inspiration from the traditional Twelve Days of Christmas, this would be a great book to read aloud.  There’s lots to see with lively and colourful illustrations, bringing to life all the different festive traditions from decorating the tree to wrapping presents to preparing food. With lots of excited little ones counting down to Christmas, it’s the perfect time to share this story.

Find out more at www.marisamorea.com and www.simonandschuster.co.uk

 

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Last Stop on the Reindeer Express by Maudie Powell-Tuck and Karl James Mountford

A young girl, Mia, misses her Daddy as Christmas approaches and even the sights and sounds at the Christmas market don’t make her feel more festive.  Mia can’t get the Christmas card she has made him delivered on time, but when she discovers a magical post box that leads her to the Reindeer Express, it seems her Christmas wish may come true.  Mia is taken by a magical reindeer on a fantastic journey over land and sea to meet a very special person and deliver her card!  When Mia has to leave her father the sky is filled with other children on their own reindeer and she understands she is not the only one missing a family member.  This helps Mia and whilst her Daddy can’t spend Christmas at home, she discovers she is brave enough to be without him.

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This is a beautiful book full of heart-warming, magical illustrations with a lovely message about families at Christmas time.  A simple narrative that even young children will relate to conveys the story, with the added magic and wonder of the festive season. Whilst we can’t always be with all of our loved ones at Christmas, knowing we’re not alone makes it easier and we can still enjoy celebrating.  With lots of lovely illustrations to look at and lift the flaps and cut-outs, Last Stop on the Reindeer Express celebrates Christmas and family perfectly.

Find out more www.karljamesmountford.com and littletiger.co.uk/authors

 

With thanks to Simon and Schuster and Little Tiger Press for sending me these books to review.

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