Category Archives: Guest post

BLOG TOUR: All I Want for Christmas by Beth Garrod

It’s the final stop on the blog tour for All I Want for Christmas by Beth Garrod, a gorgeous novel for teens full of friendship, a touch of romance and lots of festive fun! There’s also a positive message about social media – which whilst it can bring people together, also presents a ‘reality’ that is far from the truth. The heroines of the story, Holly and Elle, are both truly engaging, ending up in all manner of hilarious and ever-so-slightly awkward scenarios, and you’ll find yourself rooting for them all the way to the mistletoe- fuelled finale!

US-based Elle is a social-media influencer. But sometimes online attention isn’t all it seems from the outside; with a family who are constantly on the move, and so-called friends putting pressure on her to increase her following, she decides to swap places with one of her followers for the holidays.

Holly lives in a small village in England, and LOVES Christmas more than anything else. Nothing is going to get in the way of this year being the BEST Christmas ever . . . Nothing! But when her mum announces she’s selling their house, and Woody decides they should go on a ‘break’, her plans for the perfect Christmas start to crumble like over-baked gingerbread people.

Will swapping with Elle be Holly’s perfect opportunity to escape? And far from home, will they both find all they want for Christmas?

I’m delighted to share a post from author Beth Garrod, with a fantastic finale to this very festive blog tour – welcome to the blog Beth!

“Today is the final stop on the All I Want For Christmas blog tour – so to do Holly proud it’s finishing with a big tinsely bang. A big tinsely 70s bang. Because when it comes to Christmas, you can be cool like Elle orrrr, you can cover yourself in glitter, pull on your turkey slippers, and dance like no one is watching. Which is exactly what Holly would recommend.

So here it is, the final tune to get you shaking your baubles and twirling those Christmas puddings. After all… IT’S CHRISTMAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSSS.

Wizzard: I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day

This is a song about loving Christmas, a lot – which is something Holly is ALL about (although, when it comes to wanting it to be Christmas every day, 2020 might have clinched that vibe). This song is stuffed with sleigh bells, Christmassy choirs, and lyrics about getting your beard frozen. What more could a Christmas song want?! Sure, the video might be weird, but that is exactly what Spotify is for. Cranking this up and wishing every day could be a day you get to hang out with the best people, wear pyjamas for longer than is necessary, and eat whatever is within reaching distance. Chocolate Orange counts as fruit, right?

So however you like to bring Christmas magic, whether you do it with a million traditions like Holly, or keep it low-key like Elle, get this tune on, and let the bellsssss ring ouuuuut fo-o-orrr Chriiiiistmaaaaaas.”

Find out more here: Beth Garrod (bethhgarrod.com)

With thanks to Scholastic for sending me this book to review and inviting me to participate in the blog tour. Merry Christmas! Don’t forget to check out the rest of the blog tour:

GUEST POST: Poetry and privacy with A.F Harrold

A.F.Harrold is an award-winning poet and author, most recently shortlisted for the CLiPPA 2020 for Midnight Feasts: Tasty poems chosen by A.F. Harrold, illustrated by Katy Riddell. The judges, including 2019 CLiPPA winner poet Steven Camden (aka Spoken Word artist Polarbear) described Ashley’s book as ‘a delicious and quirky collection of poems old and new, skilfully curated and perfectly paced.’

I’ve been privileged to see Ashley performing poetry and running school workshops with children aged 7 and 8 – you’d be hard-pressed to say who enjoyed it more – the children or the adults in the room! His energy, humour and love for poetry is contagious. Read an extract from Midnight Poems:

I am absolutely thrilled to welcome Ashley to the blog today with a guest post about poetry and privacy and how we can use poetry to help deal with the things that trouble us. Welcome to the blog Ashley!

Poetry and Privacy – A.F. Harrold

“What I love, and have always loved, about poetry (and about all art, really) is that it’s none of your business.

What I mean is, when I read a book or a poem or listen to a piece of music or hear a joke, I am under no obligation to share it. I don’t have to tell anyone about it. Not about what I thought of it, or how it made me feel, or what it reminded me of, or what connections I traced from it to other pieces of art I’ve consumed before. I can keep all of that to myself.

Art is private, and one’s responses to art are private.

Sure, you might be the sort of person who loves sharing, in which case share away.

But for those of us who aren’t sharers, who don’t much care for the outside world, that feeling of ‘This-is-mine-ness’ of a book or a poem or a story overheard… that thing that happens in the solitary heart and the reader, the listener, is special. It’s a treasure, it’s something that belongs to us, a gem sparkling in the head of the toad of ourselves.

No one has the right to ask you what you think about this or that book or poem (or rather they have the right, but you have no duty to answer them). Keep it safe, keep it secret, if you want.

(You may not have much that belongs to you. You might have to share your toys, your bedroom, your bathwater. But this one thing, this treasure in your head, no one can take that away.)

And the same should go for making art.

You should feel free, whether you’re 8 or 80, to make poems, to do drawings, to write stories, to keep a diary, and to choose to keep them to yourself or share them with the world as you see fit.

Think of making poems as diary keeping.

Use them to find shapes for your thoughts and your fears, for the things that are happening in your life and in your family, with your friends or with strangers you saw in the shops… and sometimes just writing it down will be enough to still the fear, sometimes putting it away and looking back in a month or in six months and seeing how you’ve grown or changed or stayed the same as you-from-the-past might be helpful.

Writing something and knowing that no one else will see it, read it (until or unless you choose to share it), is a way of talking to yourself, to the future you, of checking in and taking stock. It has been essential to me, at times, and if you’re shy or solitary, like I am, then it might be something you should try.

But even if you don’t write, remember to read, that too is a good way to learn about yourself.”

Find out more about A.F Harrold at www.afharroldkids.com and the CLiPPA 2020 at www.clpe.org.uk

GUEST POST: Everyone Needs a Wulfie with author Lindsay J Sedgwick

I recently reviewed Wulfie: Stage Fright by Lindsay J Sedgwick illustrated by Josephine Wolff , a charming story about families, friendship and being brave even when you’re afraid. The story features a young girl LIbby who finds a much needed friend in Wulfie. Although he gets her into some scrapes, he also is a staunch ally when she needs it most. Read the review here.

I’m really pleased to welcome author Lindsay to the blog today with a guest post about why everyone needs a Wulfie. Welcome to the blog Lindsay!

Lindsay J Sedgwick

Everyone Needs a Wulfie

“It’s that simple. We all need friends, and every child needs a Wulfie.

That’s why he exists. It’s why he was created. So that every child diving into these books could imagine she was Libby and Wulfie was her best friend.

He’s a lot more loyal than many friends in the real world when you’re a child and he was invented for that very reason. For my daughter, also called Libby, who really, REALLY wanted a best friend.

She was four when Wulfie first appeared. I was sitting on her bed trying to make up stories for her. He was the explanation as to why we always had 17 odd socks – Wulfie was eating the ones that vanished before they ever made it to the washing machine. He could grow and shrink, he was purple and he loved her more than anything. He also kept getting her into more trouble, despite his intentions being good.

He was incredibly nosy and impulsive, while she was just trying to get through the days without being blamed for stuff her brother did.

Every story was adlibbed on the spot, so if I ran out of steam or inspiration, I’d ask Libby to give me three words – an object, a mood, a place, a sound …. and use those to make up a fresh adventure for the duo.  It got to the point where she wouldn’t let me take the short cut of reading a book to her – it had to be a new Wulfie story.

They weren’t always very good, but the central relationship was always fun, if sometimes sticky, muddy, messy … Because Wulfie and Libby had to face adversity, jeopardy, fear, meanness, even true nastiness so that they would triumph in the end and Libby would go to sleep with a smile on her face.

Wulfie, we discovered, would eat anyone who was mean to Libby. And, yes, the fictional Libby would make him spit them out, but for a while after they’d be sniffing bums or chasing a tail they didn’t have, so there was payback! He was fluffy and scruffy and cheeky and mischievous. And, to begin, nobody knew he existed except her.

Stories started to take us through several nights, trying to find extra twists, extra obstacles, extra fun and slapstick. Pretty soon Libby was wishing Wulfie was real and I started writing notes after she’d gone to sleep ….

Wulfie, in short, was the ultimate best friend.

That this was the motor behind the series was consolidated years later when I asked her – then aged 7 – what a best friend was. We were waiting for the bus to town and she had been musing about how everyone else seemed to have one.

“Someone who would walk through flames for me,” she said.

As a parent, my heart sank. I admired her courage and ambition, but how could anyone live up to this? It’s no use as a parent to tell your child that they will meet that ‘best friend’ at some point in the future, probably. That maybe you’re more interesting and special and shouldn’t try so hard. When you see everyone else pairing up and forming groups, it makes you sad inside.

This is where books come in to keep us going. To allow us to dive in, to be an invented world with all sorts of friends, having adventures and eventually triumphing.

Like many writers, I was the child looking on at peers who seemed to more easily make friends. I was also a daydreamer who was almost always somewhere else in my imagination when I wasn’t meant to be. Writing essays that were condemned as being too creative. When I read books then, I reinvented myself as the characters, living through their adventures and friendships. I find it all too easy to remember what it was like as a child so when I write, I am my characters; talking aloud, twitching, being in the story with them and hearing their voices in my head.

Wulfie went through a few incarnations between then and now. My daughter is now 21, doing her final year in UCC. But it was set in stone back in those first days that Wulfie’s role was that to be the best friend ever, loyal to Libby regardless of everything and everyone else.

And yes, this does mean he’s going to get her into adventures and scrapes she might not have chosen, but with all of these, she gets stronger and more confident.

That was what I wanted for my daughter Libby, way back then, and for every kid I knew. I still do.”

Find out more about Wulfie: Stage Fright at www.littleisland.ie