New review: Pog by Padraig Kenny

Pog is the highly anticipated new middle-grade novel from the author of Tin, Pádriag Kenny. Published by Chicken House, Pog was chosen as Independent Bookseller’s Book of the Month for April. Featuring a unique magical creature and a heartfelt adventure, Pog brings to life a fantastical world and vibrant characters and is sure to achieve the same critical acclaim of the author’s first novel.

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Pog by Pádriag Kenny

David and Penny’s strange new home is surrounded by forest. It’s the childhood home of their mother, who’s recently died. But other creatures live here … magical creatures, like tiny, hairy Pog. He’s one of the First Folk, protecting the boundary between the worlds. As the children explore, they discover monsters slipping through from the place on the other side of the cellar door. Meanwhile, David is drawn into the woods by something darker, which insists there’s a way he can bring his mother back …

Totally quirky from the first page, Pog brings to life a brave new hero and a heartfelt story of loss, love and family.  Moving in to their ancestral home surrounded by an old and dark forest, Penny and David are reeling from the death of their mother, with their father on the brink of breakdown.  The atmosphere of grief is palpable and little do they realise there are dark creatures just waiting to feed on their sadness.  Thankfully Pog, a Lumpkin and member of the First Folk and protector, lives in the attic. He’s a funny little creature whose task it is to protect The Necessary, the portal to another world through which dark creatures threaten to invade. With the ever-increasing danger lurking and David being tricked into thinking he can get his mother back, Pog has his work cut out in protecting the family, capturing the creatures that have already escaped through the portal and making sure The Necessary is forever closed.  This adventure’s finale will have readers holding their breath!

Pog’s antics are often very humorous and provide a good balance to the sadness of the tale, reminding us that there is always hope. The tension builds throughout and there are some truly moving moments between the family as they all try and come to terms with their grief, which are handled very sensitively and feel very real. The forest and its creepy inhabitants are also thoroughly believable – I don’t ever want to meet a bloodworm or a greebeldy! Pog’s bravery unites both Penny and David – his story is that of a true hero and will delight all readers.

Find out more at www.chickenhousebooks.com  and follow the author on Twitter

With thanks to Chicken House for sending me this book to review.

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New review: Wildspark by Vashti Hardy

After the success of the brilliant Brightstorm, it is no surprise that Vashti Hardy’s latest novel Wildspark published by Scholastic, has been much anticipated. And with good reason – it’s brilliant!  Featuring all the best elements of a great children’s sci-fi fantasy novel – awe inspiring imagination, incredible characters, unexpected plot twists and a truly believable world – middle grade readers will dive into Medlock and not want to come back! Vashti Hardy is a copywriter with an MA in Creative Writing and an alumna of and mentor at the Golden Egg Academy

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Wildspark by Vashti Hardy

Prue is a young farm girl whose older brother, Francis, had a natural talent for engineering. But after his untimely death, the family have been shattered by grief. Everything changes when a stranger arrives at the farm. A new, incredible technology has been discovered in the city of Medlock, where a secretive guild of inventors have found a way to bring spirits of the dead back into the world, capturing their energy and powering animal-like machines (the Personifates). Unaware that Francis has died, the Ghost Guild wants him to join them as an apprentice. Prue poses as “Frances” and goes to Medlock to learn the craft – but she’s on a mission of her own, to bring her brother back home. And to find Francis, she needs to find a way to help the ghost machines remember the people they used to be. But if she succeeds, the whole society could fall apart.

If you lost someone you loved and thought there might be a way to get them back, would you do anything you could to try? Even if it meant going against your parents’ wishes and deceiving all those around you? That is the idea at the heart of this fantastic story – and the challenges that trying to reverse the inevitability of death causes. Bursting at the seams with thrilling adventure and a truly thought-provoking narrative, Wildspark will keep you on the edge of your seat throughout.  As the story unfolds, we discover Prue is a feisty and determined heroine, applying her engineering knowledge – and a whole lot of new skills she learns as an apprentice – to find her brother.

Against a backdrop of uncertainty about the future of Personifates and growing debate about their rights as ‘humans’, Prue must use all her ingenuity and quite a bit of deception to enable her to succeed.  Thankfully she finds support from her new found friends and fellow apprentices – Agapantha and Edwin – who is the first ever Personifate apprentice. Together they navigate the challenges of being apprentices, boarding school and meeting their training mentors. But it is clear that Prue’s desire for discovery will come at a very high price and she and her friends face all manner of dangers in order to overcome the terror that is constantly lurking.

Featuring a truly imaginative world full of breath-taking scenery, wondrous inventions and the most marvellous array of characters you could hope to meet, Wildspark is one of the best books I’ve read this year. I hope there will be a sequel!

Find out more at www.vashtihardy.com and follow Vashti on Twitter.

With thanks to Scholastic for sending me a proof copy of this book to review.

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New review: We Won an Island by Charlotte Lo

On the blog today is my review of the middle-grade debut from Charlotte Lo, We Won An Island, published by Nosy Crow. With it’s bright, colourful cover and brilliant concept for a fun-filled story, I was immediately taken back to childhood summer adventures where everything is possible!

Charlotte wrote her first story when she was six years old, on a square of bumpy kitchen towel. Now with a masters degree in Writing for Young People behind her, Charlotte is set for success with this lovely tale – and I’m keeping my eye out for competitions to win an island!We-Won-an-Island-491909-1-360x553.jpg

We Won an Island by Charlotte Lo

When Luna’s family win an island, Luna thinks it will solve everything AND she can finally get a donkey! But things don’t go entirely to plan – no one expects Luna’s younger brother to win a Sheep Pageant, for example – and the secret festival they hold soon spirals out of control. But the island is beautiful, and the family are happy, and maybe Luna will get her donkey after all…

We Won an Island has an instantly appealing storyline – who wouldn’t want to win their very own island and have fun-filled adventures complete with goats, secret festivals and quirky characters?! With a larger than life family at it’s heart, the story starts with their life in a precarious state as they are about to be evicted from their home. Grandma has recently passed away, Dad is lost in grief and Mum is doing all she can to support the three children; Luna, Margot and Fabien.

Luckily, ten-year-old Luna takes matters into her own hands and enters a competition to win an island from an eccentric billionaire – and they win! All their problems seemed to be solved – Mum can start her yoga retreats, Luna can have a donkey sanctuary and surely Dad will start to feel better with so much to look forward to? Except of course life is never quite that simple and as the family navigate their new world – from meeting the ‘neighbours’ to exploring the island to cleaning up the huge mansion that is to be their home, there are lots of laughs, tears and hilarity along the way. Especially when the three children organise a ‘secret’ music festival to fund their ambitious island plans!  We Won an Island is an enjoyable, quirky and fun read creating a truly warm picture of the ups and downs of family life.

Find out more at www.charlotteloauthor.co.uk and follow Charlotte on Twitter.

With thanks to Nosy Crow for sending me a proof copy of this book to review.

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STOP PRESS! Branford Boase Award 2019 Shortlist announced!

BBA_LogoI am so excited to share the Branford Boase Award shortlist on the blog today! This Award celebrates the most promising book for seven year-olds and upwards written by a first-time novelist and also highlights the importance of the editor in the development of new authors. The Branford Boase Award is synonymous with brilliant writing and editing talent and is a very special award.

The Branford Boase Award is given annually to the author of an outstanding debut novel for children. Uniquely, it also honours the editor of the winning title and highlights the importance of the editor in nurturing new talent.  It is twenty years since the Branford Boase Award was founded to commemorate author Henrietta Branford and influential Walker Books editor Wendy Boase who worked together and both died of cancer in 1999.  The Award, sponsored by Walker Books, is now recognised as one of the most important in children’s books. Over its 20 year history, winners and shortlisted authors reads like a who’s who of children’s writers! Siobhan Dowd, Meg Rosoff, Mal Peet, Philip Reeve, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Frances Hardinge, Patrick Ness and Marcus Sedgwick to name a few.

fire bed and boneThis year to mark the 20th anniversary of the Branford Boase Award, Walker Books have reissued Henrietta Branford’s novel Fire, Bed and Bone. Marcus Sedgwick, who won the Branford Boase Award in 2001, says: “Fire, Bed and Bone is one of those very short books that is nevertheless powerful and moving; one of those books which oozes confidence from the first line to the last. Its prose is robust and rhythmic; flawless in its execution, showing just what complex themes and stories one can address in a ‘book for children”

You could be in with a chance to get your hands on one of FIVE copies of this brilliant story – head over to Twitter and enter my giveaway!

Running alongside the Branford Boase Award, the Henrietta Branford Writing Competition encourages writing talent in under 18s. The Award is the joint idea of Julia Eccleshare and Anne Marley. Julia is chair of PLR and director of the Hay Festival children’s programme. Anne was a co-director of Authors Aloud UK and was Head of Children’s, Youth & Schools Services for Hampshire Library & Information Service for many years.  Last year’s winners were Mitch Johnson and his editors Rebecca Hill and Becky Walker with Kick (Usborne).

The Shortlist!

The shortlist for the 2019 award features the Blue Peter Book Award winner; a book that made the Costa shortlist; and a book in the running for the 2019 CILIP Carnegie Medal. I do not envy the judges their task in selecting a winner from this fantastic list of titles!

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The House with Chicken Legs by Sophie Anderson, edited by Rebecca Hill and Becky Walker (Usborne) A beautifully told, original take on the tale of Baba Yaga this timeless story of death and grief and the zest for life stars a sentient house with chicken legs

The Train to Impossible Places by P.G. Bell, edited by Rebecca Hill and Becky Walker (Usborne) When a magical train drives through her hallway it’s the start of an extraordinary adventure for science-loving Suzy, one that will take her to some very strange places.

Rosie Loves Jack by Mel Darbon, edited by Sarah Stewart (Usborne) A contemporary love story starring Rosie, who is 16 and has Down’s syndrome; and Jack, who attends the same college in a specialist unit. When Jack is sent away, Rosie is determined to see him again, whatever it takes.

The Goose Road by Rowena House, edited by Mara Bergman (Walker Books) Set in France during the First World War, this novel tells of Angelique and her belief that her brother Pascal will return from the trenches to take over the family farm.  She is determined to keep the farm and the herd of geese he loves so much safe for him.

I Am Thunder by Muhammad Khan, edited by Lucy Pearse (Macmillan) Bright but shy Muzna is the sixteen-year-old only child of Pakistani parents now settled in Britain. Her father wants her to become a doctor whereas she can only think about her writing. The story changes course when Muzna gets dangerously over-involved in a manipulative terrorist cell.

Orphan Monster Spy by Matt Killeen, edited by Sarah Stewart and Kendra Levin (Usborne) When Sarah’s mother is shot dead, there’s no time to grieve. A Jew in Nazi Germany, she uses her talent as an actress to become a school-girl spy, though she’s keenly aware that her life counts very little to her spy-master.

The Boy at the Back of the Class by Onjali Q Raúf, edited by Lena McCauley (Orion Children’s Books) The arrival of a new boy in class, who doesn’t speak, or smile, and disappears at break times, intrigues the narrator of this book and when she finds out that his family are lost somewhere in Europe, she and her friends decide to help.

The judging panel this year is: Sanchita Basu De Sarkar, Children’s Bookshop, Muswell Hill; Ellen Krajewski, librarian, Hemel Hempstead School, Hertfordshire; Louise Johns-Shepherd, CLPE ; and Mitch Johnson, author of Kick, winner of the 2018 Branford Boase Award. The panel is chaired by Julia Eccleshare.

Julia Eccleshare says: “In its twenty-year history, the Branford Boase Award has given a crucial early career boost to the most exciting and important young authors, and prompted publishers to seek out new talent. What’s more, it continues to reflect the shape and preoccupations of contemporary children’s literature: this year’s shortlist is weighted towards fiction for readers aged 8 – 11, but themes explored include resilience, identity and a sense of self. We are proud of every one of its twenty shortlists and happy that so many years after their deaths, Wendy Boase and Henrietta Branford are celebrated in such a positive way.”

Huge congratulations to all the authors and editors on the shortlist!

For more information about the award, including a full list of past winners, and the Henrietta Branford Writing Competition visit www.branfordboaseaward.org.uk.

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BLOG TOUR: The Fire Maker by Guy Jones


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The Fire Maker by Guy Jones

Alex loves magic – its glamour, tricks and illusions. He’s good at it, too: he’s reached the semi-finals of a prestigious competition for young magicians. But when he stumbles into strange Mr Olmos’s back garden while running from his former best friend, Alex sees something he can’t explain: three tiny flames floating in the air. Fire magic. Real magic. Soon, Alex and Mr Olmos are swept up in a great adventure of secrets, genies and an ancient, bitter rivalry …

From the first page The Fire Maker is a fantastic, bursting-with-magic, totally engaging story! It is with great pleasure I am hosting today’s stop on the blog tour for Guy Jones’ second middle grade standalone novel, published by Chicken House. With themes of trickery, trust and ambition and an unforgettable friendship, The Fire Maker is sure to achieve the critical acclaim of his first book The Ice Garden. 

I was completely hooked on this new tale – it’s impossible not to love with the central characters in The Fire Maker. Eleven year old Alex, a magician in the making, and his strange, and somewhat unusual elderly friend Mr Olmos are a perfect combination. This story is a real page-turner with magic at it’s heart and themes of friendship and family making it totally relatable for young readers.  I’m delighted to welcome Guy Jones to the blog today with a guest post sharing his thoughts on the experience of writing his second novel:

The Sophomore Slump

Guy Jones Photo lowres“A confession. I am bad at answering questions about my books. Sometimes it’s the fault of the questioner. For example, there is no good answer to the poser ‘what kind of book is it?’ But mostly the problem lies with my own awkwardness, embarrassment and congenital inability to talk about my writing without feeling like a complete tool.

But, in the lead up to the publication of my new book, The Fire Maker, I’ve been asked the same thing over and over, by all kinds of people, and it’s got me thinking. The question is this… Was it more difficult to write the second one?

I think that’s a loaded sentence. I think it comes with an implicit knowledge of what Americans call the sophomore slump – that is, when someone’s second effort singularly fails to live up to the standards of the first. Its most famous manifestation is the ‘difficult second album’ so many bands encounter, but you can find it everywhere, from art to sport to scientific discovery. Look no further than the progression from Crocodile Dundee (Rotten Tomatoes critics rating – 87% fresh), to Crocodile Dundee 2 (11% fresh.) Ouch.

So, am I worried about meeting the same fate as Mick Dundee? Well, yes, obviously. Suddenly there are expectations to measure up to – my own, my publisher’s, and those of the readers kind enough to tell me they enjoyed The Ice Garden. But, to be honest, like many writers I am often brought up short by the thought of ‘oh my god, what if this is terrible?’ That’s not a second book thing, that’s just a thing. And, besides, there are just as many successful follow ups as there are flops. The Dawn of the Dead, The Empire Strikes Back, and Gremlins 2 (yes, really) all knock the originals into a cocked hat.

For me, the second go was easier in some ways. I could neatly sidestep, or at least stagger around, some of the traps I’d encountered in writing my first book. In fact, it was a lovely feeling to spot mistakes coming and give them a swerve (only to run into a whole bunch of exciting new ones of course). On top of that, having a timetable from my publisher was brilliant for focusing the mind. You can’t write yourself in circles when you’re on a deadline.

But the second book did bring one main difficulty, and that was in choosing an idea to start with. The first time around I could wait until the idea that had been brewing at the back of my mind was ready to go. This time around however there was time pressure, and I had to start pouring when it was still weak and watery. I had to plunge headlong into writing something and hope to god I didn’t get two-thirds of the way through only to discover it was a stinker.

So, was it more difficult to write the second one? Yes it was, in lots of ways. And no, it wasn’t in others. Every book is difficult on its own terms. But the excitement of the second book for me was in wanting to live up to expectations. And I very much hope that’s what I’ve done.”

Find out more at Chicken House  and follow Guy on Twitter @guyjones80 

With thanks to Chicken House for sending me this book to review and inviting me to be part of this blog tour. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the blog tour:

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Children’s Book Award BLOG TOUR! Armistice Runner by Tom Palmer

CBA-no-date-3-300x219I am hugely excited to be participating in the Children’s Book Award official blog tour in the books for older readers category again this year.  It’s the only national book award to be voted for entirely by children from start to finish and as such makes the award even more noteworthy.

Today I’m championing Armistice Runner by Tom Palmer, published by Barrington Stoke.  Tom has written some fantastic historical fiction titles and this is no exception.

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Armistice Runner by Tom Palmer

Lily has lots of worries. Sheʼs struggling to compete in her fell-running races and, worse, sheʼs losing her gran to Alzheimerʼs. But then she discovers her great-great-grandfatherʼs diaries from the First World War. Could his incredible story of bravery help her reconnect with her gran and even give her the inspiration she needs to push through and win?

Lily is really fed-up with always finishing her beloved fell-races as a runner-up.  At the end of every race, she just can’t seem to breakthrough the final barrier and push forward for the win. Endlessly frustrated, Lily’s worries are compounded by a visit to her grandparents and being faced with the reality that her wonderful grandmother is suffering with dementia.  The impact her grandmother’s illness is having on her family becomes all too real – even Lily’s irritating little brother can see how different everything is and looks to her for comfort.  A surprise discovery about her great-great-grandfather, Ernest, provides an unexpected escape and incredible connection with the past, offering Lily the inspiration she needs.  For he too was a fell-runner and faced huge pain and suffering during the course of World War One.  As his experiences come to life in the pages of his diaries, Lily starts to see that maybe she can get through her struggles and be like Ernest.

First and foremost this is a fantastic story – moving, engaging, thrilling, insightful – brilliant storytelling at its best. Bringing together two narratives, Armistice Runner provides an amazing insight into the fallen heroes of World War One alongside the experiences of Lily, whose family situation is causing great suffering.  With themes of conflict, family, rivalry and perseverance you can’t fail to be moved.  I knew nothing about fell-running prior to reading this story and found this aspect completely fascinating.  I have read many stories set in World War One, but Armistice Runner brings a new perspective on the horrors of trench warfare and the suffering endured by those on the Front and those at home. Tom Palmer captures this brilliantly and the empathy that Lily feels for Ernest, perfectly mirroring her own sadness as her grandmother slowly fades through dementia. It was particularly moving to see how this horrible illness affected the whole family and the moments where Lily sees her father’s response to his mother’s decline will have your heart aching. As Lily reaches the end of Ernest’s diaries, she finally discovers what happened to him and is given the best example of perseverance, kindness and friendship.

Armistice Runner offers opportunities for readers to truly relate to the themes of conflict through the parallels drawn with fell-running and the determination, bravery, and grit required to complete a race.  Endurance takes on new meaning as we see Ernest running through the trenches to save his fellow soldiers and escape the horrors of war. However, at no point is the story inaccessible to readers, on the contrary, it will help them gain a new understanding of World War One through the understanding it generates.  With a great female protagonist in Lily and an inspirational hero in Ernest, Armistice Runner is the best combination of story, hope and empathy. I would highly recommend it and its place on the Children’s Book Award shortlist is thoroughly deserved.

You can reading the first chapter of Armistice Runner here and find out more about Tom Palmer here. As a Barrington Stoke title, Armistice Runner offers a truly accessible read, with a super-readable layout and typeface so that even more readers can enjoy it.

CBA-no-date-3-300x219The Children’s Book Award is the only national award voted for solely by children from start to finish. Any child up to the age of 18 can visit to vote for their favourite books from the top 10. It is highly regarded by parents, teachers, librarians, publishers and children’s authors and illustrators as it truly represents the children’s choice. Thanks to the support of the publishers, over 1,000 new books are donated to be read and reviewed by Testing Groups across the country every year, with over 150,000 total votes being cast in the process. At the end of each testing year, nearly 12,000 books are donated to hospitals, women’s refuges, nurseries and disadvantaged schools by the Testing Groups. Previous winners of the award include, Michael Morpurgo and Michael Foreman, Quentin Blake, JK Rowling, Jacqueline Wilson and Rick Riordan.

Follow the award on Twitter @cbacoordinator and use #fcbgcba19 to stay up to date!  And don’t forget to check out the rest of the CBA Blog Tour and the other books in the Older Reader’s category:

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With thanks to  the Children’s Book Award for inviting me to participate in this wonderful award blog tour. Thank you to Barrington Stoke for sending me a copy of Armistice Runner to review.

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Picture Book Bonanza!

I absolutely love picture books. What better way to introduce children to the wonder of storytelling than through incredible illustrations pictured alongside brilliant narratives? The best picture books can be fun and light-hearted celebrating the world around us, but can also leave you with something to think about.  Picture books can very often open the door to conversations around empathy and understanding and help children see themselves and how they can relate to others. So here’s my round up of some newly published and soon to be published picture books for Spring!

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When a Dragon Comes to Stay by Caryl Hart and Rosalind Beardshaw

 

When dragon comes to stay, will she behave herself? Why of course she will. Obviously she knows she must share her toys, eat daintily and skip happily upstairs at bathtime.  Well….not quite. Like all toddlers this little dragon finds good manners a tiny bit tricky. Luckily she has some friends to help her.

What a lovely rhyming story this is! Bright, colourful illustrations bring dragon and her friends to life, perfectly capturing the perils of life as a toddler and show just what good behaviour looks like. Great to read aloud and have young readers joining in this is sure to be a hit at bedtime. And grown ups who want to encourage good manners will love it too!

Available now, find out more at www.nosycrow.com,  www.carylhart.com and www.rosalindbeardshaw.com

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Wish by Chris Saunders

Rabbit has never caught a wish before, then one magical day he catches three! But what amazing things should he wish for? With the help of his best friends Mouse, Fox and Bear, Rabbit discovers that thinking of others can sometimes bring the greatest reward of all.

This is an absolutely gorgeous book with an emotive story about the wonder of friendship and kindness. Muted, atmospheric illustrations with touches of colour, create a beautiful landscape where Rabbit discovers the true power of a wish. It also celebrates the possibilities of adventure and the hopes and dreams we all have. A lovely story to share, Wish would be a great way to start conversations around empathy and being kind, but also a really lovely story to leave in children’s imaginations as they drift off to sleep at bedtime!

Available now, find out more at www.quartoknows.com

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The Astro Naughty Naughty Baddies by Mark Sperring and David Tazzyman

54321 Blast off! The Naughty Naughty Baddies are zooming off the the moon. Kerzoom! Will our fiendish fraudsters come undone with their mischievous plans to capture some aliens? Mwa-ha-ha!

Another adventure featuring the Naughty Baddies that will have children and adults giggling along with glee!  And these baddies are very naughty indeed, doing anything they can think of to come up with mischief and mayhem – even if it means trying to fool the President.  Larger than life, brilliant illustrations bring the deliciously devious baddies to life and children will love the intergalactic theme. And grown-ups will be relieved that the naughtiness gets its comeuppance! A great fun read for families to share.

Available now, find out more at www.bloomsbury.com and www.davidtazzyman.com

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Mira’s Curly Hair by Maryam al Serkal and Rebeca Luciani

Mira doesn’t like her hair, it curls at the front. it curls at the back. It curls everywhere! She wants it to be straight and smooth, just like her Mama’s. But then something unpredictable happens…and Mira will never look at her Mama’s hair the same way again!

A fabulous story which many will identify with – there’s nothing worse than a bad hair day -especially if it’s every day! Humourous depictions of Mira trying to straighten her curly hair, which seems to have a life of its own, will bring a smile to your face. A simple narrative and vibrant illustrations with a stunning Arabic backdrop bring the story to life as Mira discovers that her Mama’s hair is just like hers so she doesn’t feel so bad anymore. Delightful to share, this story will encourage young readers to celebrate their uniqueness!

Publishing in April, find out more at www.lantanapublishing.com and www.rebecaluciani.es

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Crime Squirrel Investigators The Naughty Nut Thief

Rosie can’t believe it! Who’s eaten all of her delicious hazelnuts? She’s determined to find the naughty nut thief and ask Charlie to help her.  Can the two Crime Squirrel Investigators solve the case?

A fun mystery adventure for young readers, this story creates a wonderful woodland world with delightful characters. Rosie and Charlie use all their wits to solve the mystery but Charlie has a secret which he finds very hard to share. A story to entertain and get children thinking in more ways than one; they can discover more about woodland creatures, use the clues to help find the culprit and learn about being truthful and saying sorry. An all round great read!

Available in May find out more about this story and Little Door books at www.bouncemarketing.co.uk

I Don’t Want to be Small by Laura Ellen Andersen

I don't want to be small

This little boy is fed up with being so little. He wants to be as tall as his friends and his big brother. But when he loses his teddy bear up a tree, not even his new tall friend can get it back for him. Maybe with a little bit of help they can reach the bear together …

With all the ingredients for a perfect picture book, I Don’t Want to be Small is a fantastic story sure to delight young readers! With brilliant illustrations featuring Laura Ellen Andersen’s trademark style, you instantly empathise with the little boy’s plight as he shares his frustration at being small.  There’s just the right amount of humour and heart, and a very satisfying ending as he makes a new friend and finds out being small isn’t so bad after all.  I loved it!

Publishing in May, find out more at www.bloomsbury.com and www.lauraellenanderson.co.uk

With thanks to Nosy Crow, words and pictures, Bloomsbury, Lantana and Little Door Books for sending me these lovely titles to review.

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