New review: The Story of Little Mole who knew it was None of his Business by Werner Holzwarth and Wolf Erlbruch

 

41iOgHykHzL._SY358_BO1,204,203,200_

Celebrating 30 years of publication, The Story of Little Mole who knew it was None of his Business has delighted readers young and old. It is written by Werner Holzwarth and Wolf Erlbruch, a German author/illustrator team, who are highly regarded for their humourous and playful characters. This quirky detective story enjoys a cult following and has been published in ‘plop-up’ format – and would you believe, has even been performed as musical theatre?!

When it arrived on my doorstep, I will admit to being totally surprised by the theme having not come across it before. But it is very funny and given how much toilet humour can be found in many funny books for children, this book was clearly way ahead of its time when it was originally published in 1989.

 

The Story of Little Mole who knew it was None of his Business tells the tale of a little mole who wakes up one morning only to find another animal has ‘done it’s business’ on his head! Furious, he sets off to find out who and what follows is a very funny investigation of animals and their varying types of poo! Mole manages to solve the mystery and exact a rather fitting (if slightly smaller) revenge.  I can imagine young children laughing out loud and sharing lots of ‘ewwww’s’ as they hear and see Mole’s journey of discovery!  This would be a great story to read aloud, with the large text and illustrations making it easy to share in a group setting.

There will be Little Mole events at the Edinburgh and Bath Children’s Literature Festivals this year and there are some great downloadable activity packs available from Pavilion here.

I’m delighted to be offering x3 copies of The Story of the Little Mole courtesy of Pavilion to giveaway.  Find out more on my Twitter account.

With thanks to Pavilion for sending me this book to review.

41iOgHykHzL._SY358_BO1,204,203,200_

 

 

New reviews: Brilliant books from Barrington Stoke

Barrington Stoke publish really great books. That about sums it up! If you want stories that are engaging, entertaining, thought-provoking and totally accessible, then these are for you. And written by award-winning children’s writers and illustrators to boot!  Read on for my pick of their recent releases, great to engage those children and young people who aren’t avid readers – as well as brilliant quick reads for those who are.

special delivery

Special Delivery by Jonathan Meres with illustrations by Hannah Coulson is a touching tale of helping others and forging friendships across the generations.  Frank wants a new bike, so in order to save some money towards buying one he helps his sister with her paper round. And that’s how he meets an old lady who loves cowboys. Frank thinks she’s really cool and when he finds her in the park, a bit lost and confused, he decides to help her find home.  Little does he know his kindness will be repaid and the promise of a new bike won’t seem so far away! Sensitively handling the difficult subject of dementia for younger readers, this is a heart-warming story that will bring a smile to your face.

9781781128503

The Unlucky Eleven by Phil Earle illustrated by Steve May introduces the hilarious antics of the Saints football team.  Due to their excruciatingly poor form, the team think they are cursed and do everything they can to beat it. Unfortunately their attempts lead to more embarrassment and even injury! It’s up to Stanley to save the day and help his team-mates believe in themselves. Perfectly capturing the world of football, friendship and superstition around sports this is a great fun read for football fans young and old.

These two titles are from the Little Gems range which brings together the best children’s authors and illustrators and clever design to create super readable stories, for children aged 5-8.

9781781128701

The Spectacular Revenge of Suzi Sims by Vivian French illustrated by Julia Patton features a sports day drama as Suzi’s excitement about sports day is cut short.   Suzi gets off on the wrong foot with Mrs Grit, a supply teacher. Mrs Grit and Suzi’s rival, Barbie, turn Suzi’s life upside down where everything goes wrong and it seems sports day dreams of success are fading fast. Brilliantly bringing to life the perils of school from dealing with class rivals, unfair punishments and worst of all, a horrible supply teacher, young readers will relate to and thoroughly enjoy this story!

9781781128978

Gamer by Chris Bradford is a thrilling adventure and the first in the Virtual Kombat series.  Set in a dystopian future, where people escape their despair into the world of Virtual Kombat, Scott is a street kid with big dreams. Like everyone else around him, he wants to join Virtual Kombat and get off the streets for good. When it seems his dream to comes true, he can’t believe his luck.  A gripping narrative captures the peril of this story as Scott realises Virtual Kombat is not what he thought – the pain is real and so is the danger – perhaps it’s not just a game after all. A great choice for all those young gamers out there, rereleased with a new cover, the story doesn’t hold back and readers will be hooked from the first page.

9781781128749

Eagle Warrior by Gill Lewis is a beautifully written tale focusing on endangered wildlife and conservation.  When a golden eagle is found settled near her family farm, Bobbie is determined to protect it – especially when it becomes clear the eagle is in danger.  The challenge before her is made even more difficult when it seems Bobbie will be sent to boarding school, she does not want to leave her beautiful moorland home. A family row ensues with Bobbie stuck in the middle. Utterly thought-provoking and believable, the story highlights man’s disregard for wildlife even in the face of the most magnificent of species and how standing up to this can make all the difference to conservation. It’s a lesson Bobbie’s whole family learn from and the result is a new found respect for the place they call home – and each other.  The author has pledged her PLR royalties derived from this book to Wild Justice, a new organisation challenging the legalities of wildlife law.

These titles are from the middle grade category.  These books are also written by the best children’s authors and are designed to be engaging quick reads – perfect for emerging, reluctant and dyslexic readers. Clever editing and design tricks ensure stories are totally accessible.

9781781128671

Because of You by Eve Ainsworth is a timely and relevant story dealing with issues around cyber-bullying and merging families.  Teens will undoubtedly identify with Poppy and the challenges she faces as her mum’s new boyfriend moves in, along with his daughter Kayla.  The reality of family break-ups and new beginnings is palpable as Poppy’s voice shares the heartbreak and frustration she feels. Coupled with spiralling problems at school, let down by friends and family, it’s a huge relief (for the reader too!) when Poppy realises she has people on her side – people who care about her and believe in her.  Both heart-rending and heart-warming this story shines a light on the pain of divorce and cyber bullying.  Hope is never far away once you recognise the importance of being honest as a family.

This is a teen title, taken from a range which offers fantastic stories to engage teen readers, often about gritty and relevant topics. Even the most reluctant of teen readers will be drawn to these well-written and accessible books.

Find out more about the brilliant books available from Barrington Stoke here. With thanks to Barrington Stoke for sending me these books to review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer 2019 reading ideas!

IMG-6929

Now that the holidays are upon us, a few suggestions for summer reads might be handy for those moments when the kids are a little bored and with possible long-distance travel on the horizon! So today on the blog I’m sharing some ideas for summer reading, based on the books I’ve read over the last few months all of which are available now from your local bookshop or library.  Happy holidays – and happy reading!

Illustrated fiction

fabio

Fabio The World’s Greatest Flamingo Detective: Mystery on the Ostrich Express by Laura James illustrated by Emily Fox published by Bloomsbury, is the second story centred on one of my favourite character’s in children’s fiction! Set in the world of Lake Laloozee, Fabio the Flamingo sets out to solve another mystery, helped by his hapless sidekick, Gilbert the Giraffe. This time it’s the height of summer and a jewel thief is on the loose – Fabio must use all his trademark deductive powers to find the culprit. The clever plot has you turning the page right till the end and gentle humour abounds throughout making this a thoroughly enjoyable story.  Coupled with gorgeous illustrations and fabulous print production, this really is a fantastic read – especially if you happen to be travelling by train this summer! Check out my review of Fabio’s first adventure here.

molly rogers

Molly Rogers to the Rescue by Cornelia Funke illustrated by Kasia Matyjaszek published by Barrington Stoke, is a fun pirate adventure set on Monkey Skull Island. Brave Molly Rogers returns for more swashbuckling and seafaring escapades. She must defeat Captain Firebeard and his brilliantly named gang of pirates – Billy the Bald, William Wooden Hand to name a few. Young readers will delight in Molly’s adventure and enjoy cheering her and her friends on as she shows you don’t have to be big to be brave! Great fun girl-power and an accessible read with lovely illustrations highlighting all the action.

Middle grade

animal

The Great Animal Escapade by Jane Kerr published by Chicken House, is a delightful tale featuring the heroes first discovered in The Elephant Thief. Danny and his best friend, Maharajah the elephant return for a new adventure set in the Victorian zoo, Belle Vue.  Danny is settling into his new found home and family life with zoo-owner Mr Jameson and his wife, but has no time to get comfortable as a plot to frame him and ruin his reputation becomes clear. Mystery abounds as animals escape and Danny is the main suspect.  You’ll be whisked away by the well-written plot, with larger-than-life characters brilliantly bringing to life Belle Vue and it’s inhabitants.  The narrative keeps you guessing as Danny faces increasing danger.  Danny’s charming friendship with Hetty, the zoo veterinarian’s daughter, adds another layer to the story – he needs all the friends he can get!  The Great Animal Escapade is indeed a great escape – animal lovers and fans of mystery stories will not be disappointed.

9781788004695

Clifftoppers The Arrowhead Moor Adventure by Fleur Hitchcock published by Nosy Crow, is a great summer read reminiscent of Enid Blyton adventures, but brought bang up to date with determined young heroes.  Cousins Aiden, Chloe, Ava and Josh are staying with their grandparents and stumble on a mystery they can’t help but try to solve. Adventure ensues with plenty of action scenes as the gang discover a jewel heist in progress and villainous baddies at the heart of the crime.  Great interaction between the cousins, each with a distinct personality, creates believable characters – and of course Bella the dog proves a valuable helper! Edge-of-your-seat moments mean danger is never far away, but with a bit of teamwork and being just a bit clever, the bad guys get their comeuppance.  For fans of adventure stories Clifftoppers makes a great summer read!

51o9TGgHK3L._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_

Little Badman and the Invasion of the Killer Aunties by Humza Arshad and Henry White with illustrations by Aleksei Bitskoff published by Puffin is a hilarious debut featuring the wonderful voice of Humza Khan (aka Little Badman) and his misadventures with some very scary aunties. Humza is the greatest rapper Eggington has ever known – at least that’s what he thinks. But he could never have imagined just how important his rapping skills would be, as strange occurrences and disappearing teachers reveal a threat to take over the world! Prepare to laugh-out-loud as Humza’s personality and brilliant observations of childhood experiences leap off the page, captured in lively illustrations. Ably supported by a delightful cast including his Grandpa (well actually his Uncle – Humza will explain!), his good friend Umer and class swot Wendy Wang, Humza sets out to find out just why the aunties are taking over the school. It’s a crazy, madcap and mischievous adventure perfect for entertaining readers young and old.

Peril-en-Pointe-website-689x1024

Peril En Pointe by Helen Lipscombe published by Chicken House is an exciting debut with an original take on the idea of a spy school! When Milly’s mum goes missing and a mysterious scholarship arrives for Milly to attend the prestigious Swan House School of Ballet, so begins a quest to find out just where her mother has gone.  Beset with problems, Milly must prove herself in more ways than one.  She makes an admirable heroine and is supported by a cast of fairly unlikely – but very likeable – sidekicks. Peril En Pointe draws you in to the world of intrigue – with ballet and spies at it’s heart! I love the pairing of these two worlds and the school setting – and who doesn’t love a spy gadget?! A great debut novel with the promise of more, introduce your children to Milly this summer and they’ll be totally entertained.

download.jpg

My Parents Cancelled My Birthday by Jo Simmons illustrated by Nathan Reed published by Bloomsbury is a story about Tom, whose birthday party is cancelled after a series of inexplicable disasters. Think falling pigs, dogs succumbing to accident and health issues.  Tom enlists the help of his best friends and younger sister to organise his party (rather than worrying his parents) and their organisational antics are brought to life in fun illustrations throughout. Brilliantly capturing the everyday chaos of family life, the disappointment of birthday plans gone awry and trying to keep your parents happy, there is humour-galore! If you want something to make you laugh this summer, read this book!

Young Adult

412gMoi5g+L._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_

Summer of No Regrets by Kate Mallinder published by Firefly Press captures that wonderful time in life when you’ve just finished school, exams are behind you and a long summer stretches out in front of you.  Featuring four friends, each with very different backgrounds, who pledge to live a regret-free summer, taking risks and doing things that scare them to make sure they don’t waste a moment of freedom!  A strong, well-balanced narrative creates a feel-good story, as each of the friends discovers ‘no regrets’ is a hard motto to live by – especially if you are dealing with family issues. Summer of No Regrets weaves a tale of friendship which many will relate to.  It also creates some very believable scenarios handling sensitive themes with great care.  Carefree enough to provide an escape yet not without heart, this is a great holiday read.

44097002._SY475_

The Starlight Watchmaker by Lauren James published by Barrington Stoke is a fantastic and fast-paced sci-fi story. With an unlikely friendship at the centre of the story, this is a hugely imaginative and accessible read.  Hugo is the android watchmaker working in the dusty attic of an elite academy; Dorian is the privileged student being educated there. Wonderfully described, together they uncover a dastardly plot placing the whole academy in danger. Creating a world of unique beings, clockwork inventions and the power of science at its best and worst, The Starlight Watchmaker is a fantastic story.  Read it and escape to a place far away from our own – you won’t want to return!

With thanks to the publishers for sending me these books to review. They will find a great home with my Bookbuddy school!

IMG-6929

 

 

 

Book of the Month: Where Once We Stood by Christopher Riley and Martin Impey

book of the month

Fifty years ago today man landed on the Moon. I can only imagine just how unbelievable it must have seemed to the world at the time that we could actually walk on the Moon. It is therefore totally fitting that my latest Book of the Month celebrates that momentous occasion and is one that shares rare insight into the  historic event and the Apollo project as a whole.

where once we stood

Where Once We Stood by Christopher Riley illustrated by Martin Impey captures first-hand accounts of what it really felt like to land on the Moon. Between July 1969 and December 1972 twelve men landed their spaceships on the Moon, known as the Apollo project. The author has spent a lifetime studying the Apollo project and interviewing the astronauts who walked on the Moon.  In this wonderful collaboration, each Apollo mission is explored with incredible details from the conversations Christopher Riley had with the astronauts and their families.  Martin Impey’s artwork, which has been celebrated by the astronauts themselves, is a fitting accompaniment to the insight these conversations bring.  Beautiful and otherworldly, you can almost feel the lunar experience.

IMG-6927

On an informative note, there’s a map of the landing sites and at various points throughout, helpful facts share some of the science behind the Moon.  Each chapter explores one of the Apollo missions, from the first footprints left by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the final ambitious expedition as astronauts drove electric cars deep into the mountains of the moon.

IMG-6926

It is a completely fascinating read and I found myself discovering a whole world of unknown science and exploration.  This book would be wonderful to share, a fabulous addition to your family bookshelf or school library. You could study it for hours again and again and not fail to be inspired – which I think is so important in a world where the wonder of science can be lost and exploration like something that belongs in the past.  Combining a unique series of illustrations with words spoken by the astronauts themselves, Where Once We Stood is a beautiful book that will capture the imagination of readers young and old.

IMG-6925

Excitingly, this book is published by a new publishing house founded by Emilie James and Martin Impey, who aim to publish high quality books about challenging subjects for readers of all ages.  This is their first publication, bringing the human face of the Moon landings to both younger readers and those who remember them from their own childhoods.  Visit www.harbourmoonpublishing.com for more information.

With thanks to the publishers for sending me this book to review.

 

 

 

 

New review: Under a Dancing Star by Laura Wood

If you’re looking for a great summer read then look no further than the gorgeous new YA novel Under a Dancing Star by Laura Wood, published on 4th July by Scholastic.  A captivating coming-of-age story set in 1930s, it will sweep you into a glorious, romantic summer haze!

under a dancing star

Under a Dancing Star by Laura Wood

In 1930s England, Bea’s parents want her married off to keep the family estate alive. but she longs for adventure. A golden summer in Italy with her bohemian Uncle opens up a whole new world, which includes Ben , a handsome, infuriating artist. Sparks fly between the quick-witted pair until one night, under the stars, a challenge is set – can they put aside their teasing and have the perfect summer romance? There is only one rule – they absolutely must not fall in love.

Beatrice Langton has never quite fulfilled her parents expectations of being a dutiful daughter – in fact far from it. Her fascination with nature and scientific discovery, her desire for exploration and freedom do not sit well with her parents plans for marrying her off to a rich husband, thereby saving the crumbling family estate and ancestral home of Langton Hall.  Exasperated with Beatrice’s behaviour, which in their eyes is not becoming to a young lady of 17 years, her parents think that sending her to stay with her Uncle in Italy for the summer will drum some sense into her – but they couldn’t be more wrong! For Beatrice’s Uncle, after the death of his wife, has take up with a flamboyant artist and they live a wonderfully bohemian life, with her young cousin Hero, offering an open house to artists from all over the world who want somewhere inspirational to work.  So Beatrice, or Bea as she is called by her young cousin, suddenly has a world of wonder opened up to her, set against the backdrop of the beautiful Italian countryside.

Beautifully described throughout, Under a Dancing Star, brings to life a whirlwind summer romance and is a wonderful exploration of first love.  The stifling world of British aristocracy contrasts with the exuberant world occupied by those who can live as they choose.  The looming clouds of war and references to fascism and the approaching peril invade the summer haze at times and bring a dose of reality. The price of freedom is often loss of some kind which we see in the wonderful cast of characters Bea meets including, Ben, whose mother died and who ran away from an orphanage as a young boy. But the heart of the novel is Bea’s self-discovery, her new found feelings of love which are as transformational as the butterflies she likes to study and the realisation that she can choose her future.  Under a Dancing Star really does make the perfect summer read!

Find out more at www.lauraclarewood.com and www.scholastic.co.uk. With thanks to Scholastic for sending me this book to review.

under a dancing star

BLOG TOUR: Take A Chance on Me by Beth Garrod

I am so excited to be kicking off the blog tour for the new sunny, feel-good romantic comedy Take A Chance On Me by Beth Garrod, published by Scholastic.

Take a Chance on Me high res (1)

Take A Chance On Me by Beth Garrod

Meg’s first kiss was a disaster…but this summer she will have a perfect, swoony, just-like-in-the-movies kiss with a hot boy – and what better setting than the sun-drenched Greek island she’s holidaying on? But with three very different boys vying for her attention, resetting her first kiss may be more complicated than she bargained for…

Just in time for summer, this fun, feel-good story will strike a chord with young people hoping for holiday romance! Beth Garrod is the author of the Super Awkward series and has worked for broadcasters including Radio 1, Blue Peter and MTV.  She now concentrates on social impact campaigns, working with charities and broadcasters around the world to make content that can help empower young people. I am delighted to welcome Beth to the blog today for a Q & A on this first stop on the blog tour!

Describe Take a Chance on Me in five words

Can I do six?! Holiday hotties, best-mate missions, superstar surprises.

What’s your favourite holiday destination?  Well, a few years ago I visited a small Greek island for the very first time – I was so lucky. We had to catch a plane and a boat to get there, but when we arrived it was like something from a postcard! The water was like a giant warm bath, the sea and sky were the brightest blues, and everyone there was super friendly. And oh my goodness THE FOOD. The whole island was so good that it ended up being the inspiration for Meg’s surprise holiday in Take A Chance On Me.

Lots of the action in Take a Chance on Me takes place on a film set. Name your dream cast for a movie adaptation of the book. This is a hard one! Hmm… Can I dream big?

Meg – can Joey King from the Kissing Booth do it?! Or Lana Condor. Or Jessica Barden who is totally amazing. Or Amandla Stenberg.. sorry I need to stop now.

Anita (her best mate) – Manpreet Bambra from Free Rein. I love that show, and she seems super fun. Barbara Ferreira is also a total boss.

Meg’s Dad – Stephen Mangan. But he’d have to get really into health and safety. And could Jodie Comer get older to play her mum?

Billy – Maybe Ncuti Gatwa, as he brings all the laughs and all the feels in just one look. Or Lewis Capaldi, if he fancied acting?

TJ – I mean I’d love Noah Centineo to be in it, but he’s too Noah and lovely to be TJ right? Right?!

And can a young Miles Teller/ Shailene Woodley be in there too? And Marsai Martin – she’d star in the film AND keep TJ in check.

Can you share the cringiest thing that’s happened to you on holiday? Oh wow. Lots of things have happened. It’s hard to choose a winner. I think the time I did my dissertation in Ibiza on… biodiversity, was pretty excellent. Everyone else was on holiday, and glamming it up on the beach, but my uni needed video evidence I was following procedure so my friend had to document me on the beach, clutching a 1m square quadrat (a giant wooden and metal grid thing) in full high vis safety wear and non-slip shoes.

Any top tips for going on holiday with your friends? If you’re going somewhere on a plane then pack a spare swimsuit or bikini in your travel bag. I once had a case go AWOL, and let’s just say the clothes my friends lent me were all at least 4 sizes too small. It was all quite a lewk. And always have a stash of chocolate. It tastes extra good on holiday, especially if it’s fridge-chocolate. And remember a speaker. Music is a must – then you can come back and re-listen to the playlists and try and pretend you’re still there.

And something to remember if it’s your first holiday together, living with someone is harder than just hanging out, so allow everyone the space to be  a grumpy morning person, or to be sleep deprived, or a bit hot and sweaty one day. One day it’ll most likely be your turn.

Oh, and is it wrong to mention I never regret packing Marmite?

What are your favourite YA reads of 2019 so far? There have been so many! I wasn’t surprised at all that I loved Alex in Wonderland by Simon James Green so so much. Just like his Noah books it had everything in that I love – big laughs, awkward moments, and a really beautiful mega-crush. Oh My Gods by Alexandra Sheppard was another one I loved – it’s also very funny and contemporary, but with a real twist to it. Jemima Small Vs The World I adored, and wished Jemima would pop out of the pages and become real. And I’m about to go on holiday (to the non-imaginary Greek island I mentioned just before) and I can’t wait to read The Switch Up by Katy Cannon and Scar by Alice Broadway. I’ve been dying for the third book in the Ink series for ages!

Find out more about Beth at www.bethhgarrod.com.  With thanks to Scholastic for inviting me to participate in this blog tour. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the tour this week:

Blog Banner.png

 

 

 

New review: How High the Moon by Karyn Parsons

I was instantly intrigued by this story given it was written by Karyn Parsons, best known for her role as Will Smith’s ditsy cousin Hilary Banks in The Fresh Prince of Bel Air. Karyn has since gone on to found and produce Sweet Blackberry an award-winning series of children’s animated films to share stories about unsung black heroes in history. How High the Moon is her debut novel for children aged 9 and up.  A sweeping tale of growing up in segregated America, it tells the story of Ella and her family and friends and will stay with you long after the final page.

how hight hte moon

How  High the Moon by Karyn Parsons

“Boston was nothing like South Carolina. Up there, colored folks could go anywhere they wanted. Folks didn’t wait for church to dress in their fancy clothes. Fancy was just life. Mama was a city girl . . . and now I was going to be one too.”

It’s 1944, and in a small, Southern, segregated town, eleven-year-old Ella spends her summers running wild with her cousins and friends. But life isn’t always so sunny. The deep racial tension that simmers beneath their town’s peaceful facade never quite goes away, and Ella misses her mama – a beautiful jazz singer, who lives in Boston. So when an invitation arrives to come to Boston for a visit Ella is ecstatic – and the trip proves life-changing in more ways than one. For the first time, Ella sees what life outside of segregation is like, and begins to dream of a very different future. But her happiness is shattered when she returns home to the news that her classmate has been arrested for the murder of two white girls – and nothing will ever be the same again.

A moving and beautifully written historical tale drawing you into a world of racial tension, family bonds and friendship. It is told through the voices of the various central characters –11 year old Ella, desperate to find her place in the world; Henry, Ella’s steadfast best friend and Mryna, an orphan girl taken in by Ella’s grandparents who experiences first love with classmate George.  Ella has a love-hate relationship with Myrna and is often in conflict with her. When Ella goes to Boston to stay with her mother she hopes to find the truth about her father – who judging by Ella’s skin-colour and the prejudice she is often on the receiving end of, was white.  However, Ella finds her mother unwilling to share any more than this and unwilling to give up her lifestyle of late-night performing to be a stay-at-home mother. Ella finds a surprising ally in her mother’s roommate, Helen, but the time comes when she must return home. The story takes a heart-rending turn when George, Myrna’s boyfriend is accused of murder, turning their world upside down and causing increased racial tension with the threat of lynch-mobs never far away.

There are so many facets to this brilliant story and it weaves a believable but haunting narrative. Ella is a brave heroine, with a voice that must be heard. The character building is excellent and you can’t help but feel Ella, her friends and family really existed, pulling empathy from the reader from the first page. Sadly, the story of George is based on truth – George Stinney Jr was 14 years old when he was excused of murdering two white girls and executed for murder. Seventy years later he was exonerated and his trial and sentence declared a sham.

I never fail to be horrified by man’s inhumanity to man and shedding light on the racial tensions in 1940s Deep South, and what it was really like to live during this time is important. Particularly in the current climate where racial inequality still exists; this book will build empathy and understanding and would be most suitable for older primary children and also good for those students studying this period of history.  How High the Moon is brilliant and brave storytelling and is deservedly described as future classic.

how hight hte moon

Find out more www.penguin.co.uk. With thanks to Puffin for sending me this book to review.